AGES: The Untold Stories of GMO Pioneers

Keynote Speaker: Dan Charles; Panelists: Allison Snow, Scott Johnson and Jean Ristaino

September 26, 2017

Past Events/Google Calendar

  • GES Fall Colloquium

    August 22, 2017 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    1911 Building, Room 129, Current Drive, Raleigh, NC, United States

    Special topics and experimental course offerings in Genetic Engineering and Society.
    https://wolfware.ncsu.edu/courses/details/?sis_id=SIS:2017:8:1:GES:591:002

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  • GES Fall Colloquium

    August 29, 2017 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    1911 Building, Room 129, Current Drive, Raleigh, NC, United States

    Special topics and experimental course offerings in Genetic Engineering and Society.
    https://wolfware.ncsu.edu/courses/details/?sis_id=SIS:2017:8:1:GES:591:002

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  • GES Colloquium: Population Genetics of Gene Drives

    September 5, 2017 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    1911 Building, Room 129, Current Drive, Raleigh, NC, United States

    Michael Vella & Sumit Dohle: Population Genetics of Gene Drives

    A gene drive biases inheritance of a gene so that it increases in frequency within a population even when the gene confers no fitness benefit.

    There has been renewed interest in environmental releases of engineered gene drives due to recent proof of principle experiments with the CRISPR-Cas9 system as a drive mechanism.

    With the tremendous potential of gene drives to alter natural populations, there have been calls to minimize risks associated with the release of gene drives. Two ways of reducing risks are to make gene drives that are reversible and will remain localized.

    Several methods of reversing and localizing drives have been proposed with optimistic predictions about efficacy, but expected dynamics are often not analyzed in detail.

    Michael Vella will discuss theoretical analysis of gene drive countermeasures that could be used to reverse a CRISPR-based homing drive.

    Countermeasures include synthetic resistance alleles, reversal drives, and immunizing reversal drives. Unexpected dynamics arise in some cases, and each countermeasure has advantages and disadvantages that would need to be considered before use.

    Sumit Dhole will then discuss a comparative analysis of three gene drives that have been proposed for localized population alteration – the one- and two-locus underdominance drives, and the recently proposed daisy-chain drive.

    Related Publications

    Invasion and migration of self-limiting gene drives: a comparative analysis
    Dhole, S., Vella, M.R., Lloyd, A.L., Gould, F., doi: 10.1101/159855
    http://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/07/06/159855

    Evaluating Strategies For Reversing CRISPR-Cas9 Gene Drives
    Vella, M., Gunning, C., Lloyd, A.L., Gould, F. doi: 10.1101/144097
    http://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/08/10/144097

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  • GES Colloquium - Drs. Matsuo & Tachikawa, Gene Editing in Japan

    September 12, 2017 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    1911 Building, Room 129, Current Drive, Raleigh, NC, United States

    Gene Editing & Agriculture in Japan

    Dr. Makiko Matsuo is a Project Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Public Policy, the University of Tokyo. She is currently engaged in Science, Technology and Innovation Governance (STIG) Education Program. She received a Ph.D. in International Studies from the Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, the University of Tokyo in 2016. Her areas of concern are interdisciplinary in nature and covers such issues as, Risk Governance, Risk Regulation, Global Health Issues, and Food Safety.

    Dr. Masashi Tachikawa is a professor at the Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Japan. Prior to joining Nagoya University, he has spent more than twenty years working for various research institutes of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. He has a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of Tokyo. He is engaged in research activities related to regulatory framework and risk governance issues related to transgenic crops, new breeding techniques, food nanotechnology, and synthetic biology.

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  • What's for Dinner? A Guide To Understanding GMOs

    September 18, 2017 | 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre, 508 S Main St, Moscow, ID 83843, USA

    More info here:http://www.uidaho.edu/cals/news-and-events/speaker-series
    University of Idaho Speaker Series:
    Cara Santa Maria and Fred Gould will each give a keynote address about GMO’s, followed by a short question and answer session. The keynote address will be followed by a panel discussion with industry experts:

    Cathy Wilson, Director of Research Collaboration, Idaho Wheat Commission
    Doug Cole, Sr. Manager of New Product Marketing and Biotech Affairs, Simplot Plant Sciences
    Elizabeth Bingham, Farmer, American Sugar Beet Grower Biotechnology Spokeswoman

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  • GES Colloquium - Jayce Sudweeks, GM Mosquitoes

    September 19, 2017 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    1911 Building, Room 129, Current Drive, Raleigh, NC, United States

    Examining the Policy Narratives Surrounding the Releases of Genetically Modified Mosquitoes
    Speaker: Jayce Sudweeks, Ph.D. candidate

    ABSTRACT: In an effort to combat diseases such as dengue fever and Zika, genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes have been released in Brazil to control mosquito populations. A similar release effort was attempted in the Florida Keys, but has been delayed.

    Using the Narrative Policy Framework, this research examines the policy narratives of the various actors and coalitions involved in both the US and Brazil policy debates regarding release of GM mosquitoes and attempts to identify coalition and narrative factors that might influence the difference in release decisions.

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  • Dr. Rebekah Rogers "Genomic disintegration in woolly mammoths on Wrangel Island"

    September 21, 2017 | 3:15 pm - 4:30 pm
    David Clark Labs, Rm 101, Brooks Avenue, Raleigh, NC

    Genomic disintegration in woolly mammoths on Wrangel Island

    Zoology Graduate Student Association and the Genetic Engineering and Society Center have teamed up to host Dr. Rebekah Rogers from UNC Charlotte (http://evolscientist.com/)

    Refreshments will be served at 3:15pm.

    *If you would like to meet with Dr. Rogers before the seminar, we will have 30 minute slots open for individual meetings between 10am-3pm. We will also have a grad student lunch from 12:00-1:00pm.

    ***Please RSVP for an individual meeting or the grad student lunch to Sean Griffin (srgriff2@ncsu.edu)

    Following the seminar we will have a departmental potluck at the home of John Godwin and Beth Hawkins (920 Merwin Road, Raleigh). The potluck will start at 6:00pm and the department will provide a main dish. Please bring a side dish or beverage to share.

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  • GES Colloquium - Dan Charles: Genetic Engineering and Journalism

    September 26, 2017 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    1911 Building, Room 129, Current Drive, Raleigh, NC, United States

    We'll talk about some of the different ways that journalists have covered genetic engineering over the past several decades, and the journalistic conventions and impulses that shape this coverage.

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  • AAGES Event: The Untold Stories of GMO Pioneers

    September 26, 2017 | 5:30 pm - 8:00 pm
    James B. Hunt Jr. Library, Duke Energy Hall (2nd floor), 1070 Partners Way, Raleigh, NC, United States

    Together with the NC State Libraries Special Collections and Department of History, GES is creating a video archive of oral histories to document for posterity the memories and papers of the pioneers of genetic engineering. In this process, we are interviewing individuals from the first generation of researchers and regulators, many of whom are still actively working in their fields.

    Agenda:
    5:30 - 5:45: Introduction and overview of AAGES project
    5:45 - 6:30: Keynote Speaker Dan Charles
    6:30 - 7:15: Panel Discussion
    7:15 - 8:00: Reception

    Online registration: https://research.ncsu.edu/ges/events/ages-gmo-pioneers/
    For more information, please email sastauff@ncsu.edu

    Additional Details TBD

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  • Science Cafe: CRISPR & the Ethics of Editing Genes

    September 28, 2017 | 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
    NC Museum of Natural Sciences, Daily Planet Cafe, 11 West Jones St, Raleigh, NC

    http://naturalsciences.org/calendar/event/science-cafe-crispr-and-the-ethics-of-editing-genes/
    What if it were possible to genetically alter wild populations of “pest” animals so that they were either eliminated or unable to threaten rare and endangered species, transmit disease, or damage crops? Such new “gene drive” technologies may be possible to create with CRISPR and other advanced gene-editing tools. The speakers for this Café are part of an interdisciplinary project exploring potential genetic approaches to eliminating invasive mice from islands where they present a major biodiversity threat through their impacts on native flora and fauna. Their work raises questions that extend well beyond the strict technical hurdles to ecological, ethical and governance challenges.

    ABOUT OUR SPEAKERS

    John Godwin is a Professor of Biological Sciences at North Carolina State University where he focuses on behavior and reproductive biology in a range of species including sex-changing fish and, most recently, wild house mice. Jason Delborne is an Associate Professor in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources at North Carolina State University and a research leader in the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, where he studies the interactions between policymakers, scientists and the public particularly in the context of emerging biotechnologies.

    DETAILS
    Fee: Free
    Categories: Adults, Discussions, Lectures, Science Cafes, Teens
    VENUE: Daily Planet Cafe

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  • WORKSHOP: Communication, Engagement, and Biotechnology (Day 1)

    October 2, 2017 | 8:30 am - 1:00 pm
    James B. Hunt Jr. Library, Room 4103, Partners Way, Raleigh, NC, United States

    The GES Center is partnering with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the China Ministry of Agriculture, and the US Trade and Development Agency to organize a workshop on “Communication, Engagement, and Biotechnology.”

    Several Chinese government officials will be joined by a number of industry representatives from the Triangle, with the goal of sharing the insights of GES research and fostering discussion.

    GES faculty and affiliates will be making presentations each morning of October 2-4, followed by a catered lunch. The organizer of the workshop would like to extend an invitation to NCSU faculty and students who would like to participate in any of the sessions.

    If you are interested, please email Sharon Stauffer (sastauff@ncsu.edu) to confirm your spot, as spaces are limited for each section. All meetings will occur on Centennial Campus in Hunt Library Rm 4105 (accessible by elevators in the lobby prior to entering the library). You may request to attend any mix of the sessions described below.

    WORKSHOP AGENDA

    Monday, October 2
    8:30 -  10:00      Jason Delborne, Associate Professor, Dept. of Forestry and Natural Resources and Genetic Engineering and Society Center 
    What does public engagement have to offer in the realm of emerging technologies?  What kinds of engagement are useful?

    10:15 - 11:45     Andy Binder, Associate Professor, Dept. of Communication  
    Why is the public skeptical of GMOs?  What not to do in trying to reach consensus?

    12:00 pm           Working Luncheon

    RSVP to Sharon Stauffer at sastauff@ncsu.edu

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  • WORKSHOP: Communication, Engagement, and Biotechnology (Day 2)

    October 3, 2017 | 8:30 am - 1:00 pm
    James B. Hunt Jr. Library, Room 4103, Partners Way, Raleigh, NC, United States

    The GES Center is partnering with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the China Ministry of Agriculture, and the US Trade and Development Agency to organize a workshop on “Communication, Engagement, and Biotechnology.”

    Several Chinese government officials will be joined by a number of industry representatives from the Triangle, with the goal of sharing the insights of GES research and fostering discussion.

    GES faculty and affiliates will be making presentations each morning of October 2-4, followed by a catered lunch. The organizer of the workshop would like to extend an invitation to NCSU faculty and students who would like to participate in any of the sessions.

    If you are interested, please email Sharon Stauffer (sastauff@ncsu.edu) to confirm your spot, as spaces are limited for each section. All meetings will occur on Centennial Campus in Hunt Library Rm 4105 (accessible by elevators in the lobby prior to entering the library). You may request to attend any mix of the sessions described below.

    WORKSHOP AGENDA

    Tuesday, October 3
    8:30 - 10:00       Zachary Brown, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Agricultural and Resource Economics
    How do you measure public attitudes about emerging technologies?  How do we forecast consumer responses to food produced using emerging biotechnologies, before these products are introduced into the market?

    10:15 - 11:45     Jennifer Kuzma, Goodnight-North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation Distinguished Professor
    How to integrate public values and scientific knowledge in risk assessment and governance?

    12:00 pm           Working Luncheon

    RSVP to Sharon Stauffer at sastauff@ncsu.edu

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  • GES Colloquium - David Berube on Zika

    October 3, 2017 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    1911 Building, Room 129, Current Drive, Raleigh, NC, United States

    Dr. David Berube, professor of science and technology communication and Director of PCOST, will give a student-directed conversation on Zika. Potential topics include how Zika got into Brazil, why it's so dangerous (the microcephaly connection), what the future may hold, how it is being mitigated and the roles of government and media.

    Faculty page: https://communication.chass.ncsu.edu/faculty_staff/dmberube
    PCOST: http://communication.chass.ncsu.edu/pcost/
    CV: https://communication.chass.ncsu.edu/faculty_staff/get_document.php?type=vita&userid=dmberube

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  • WORKSHOP: Communication, Engagement, and Biotechnology (Day 3)

    October 4, 2017 | 8:30 am - 1:00 pm
    James B. Hunt Jr. Library, Room 4103, Partners Way, Raleigh, NC, United States

    The GES Center is partnering with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the China Ministry of Agriculture, and the US Trade and Development Agency to organize a workshop on “Communication, Engagement, and Biotechnology.”

    Several Chinese government officials will be joined by a number of industry representatives from the Triangle, with the goal of sharing the insights of GES research and fostering discussion.

    GES faculty and affiliates will be making presentations each morning of October 2-4, followed by a catered lunch. The organizer of the workshop would like to extend an invitation to NCSU faculty and students who would like to participate in any of the sessions.

    If you are interested, please email Sharon Stauffer (sastauff@ncsu.edu) to confirm your spot, as spaces are limited for each section. All meetings will occur on Centennial Campus in Hunt Library Rm 4105 (accessible by elevators in the lobby prior to entering the library). You may request to attend any mix of the sessions described below.

    WORKSHOP AGENDA

    Wednesday, October 4
    8:30 - 10:00        Todd Kuiken, Senior Research Scholar, Genetic Engineering and Society Center  
    What is the difference between PR and engagement?  How do you balance facts and values in international governance of GMOs?

    10:15 - 11:45      Jean Goodwin, Distinguished Professor, Dept. of English and Director of Leadership in the Public Science Cluster   
    How do scientists get into trouble when communicating about controversial topics?  What is defensive communication and how to avoid it? How do you become an honest broker?

    11:45 – 12:00     Jason Delborne Wrap up

    12:00 pm            Working Luncheon

    RSVP to Sharon Stauffer at sastauff@ncsu.edu

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  • Food Evolution film premiere, with Fred Gould

    October 5, 2017 | 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    The Carolina Theatre, 309 W Morgan St, Durham, NC 27701, USA

    See NC Biotechnology Center website for additional details: http://www.ncbiotech.org/event/nc-film-premiere-food-evolution/230346

    PROGRAM:
    5:00 - Doors open
    6:30 - Welcome and Introductions
    6:45 - Film
    8:15 - Panel Discussion

    Welcome & Introductions: Michelle VonCannon, NCBiotech and Richard Reich, NC Dept of Agriculture and Consumer Services

    PANEL with Q&A:

    Moderator: Linda Loveland, Anchor/Reporter, WRAL Fox 50 News
    Panelists:
    Scott Hamilton Kennedy, Director of Food Evolution
    Fred Gould, Professor and Co-Director, GES Center, NC State
    Kevin Folta, Professor and Chairman, Horticultural Sciences Dept, University of Florida

    The North Carolina Biotechnology Center, in collaboration with GMO Answers, is excited to host the North Carolina film premiere of "Food Evolution." From Academy Award®-nominated director Scott Hamilton Kennedy​ and narrated by renowned science communicator​ Neil deGrasse Tyson, "Food Evoltion" is set a midst a brutally polarized debate marked by passion, suspicion and confusion: the controversy surrounding GMOs and food.

    Tickets: $10. You may purchase tickets online, in person at Carolina Theatre Box Office or by calling 919-560-3030, Monday - Friday from 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.

    Directions/parking: Parking deck is directly across the street.
    http://www.carolinatheatre.org/visit/directions

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  • GES Lecture Series: Steven Druker - “How the Health Risks of GMOs Have Been Systematically Misrepresented: An Assessment from the Perspectives of Both Biological Science and Computer Science”

    October 9, 2017 | 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
    Daniels Hall, Room 327, 111 Lampe Dr, Raleigh, NC 27607, United States

    Register now → https://research.ncsu.edu/ges/events/steven-druker/

    Speaker: Steven Druker, Executive Director of the Alliance for Bio-Integrity and author of Altered Genes, Twisted Truth

    ABSTRACT:
    From Steven Druker: Contrary to the claims of the technology’s proponents, producing new foods through genetic engineering entails higher risks to human health than does traditional breeding; and the arguments that have been advanced to convince the public otherwise rely on multiple misrepresentations. Even reports by the US National Academy of Sciences and the UK’s Royal Society cannot withstand scrutiny, and analysis reveals that their central assertions are demonstrably false.

    The routine claim that all respected scientists and scientific organizations regard GE foods to be as safe as conventional ones is likewise false. For instance, the Royal Society of Canada, the British Medical Association, the Public Health Association of Australia, and the editors of The Lancet (a premier medical journal) have all expressed concerns about the risks.

    Further, although a substantial number of well-conducted studies published in peer-reviewed journals have detected statistically significant harm to the laboratory animals that consumed GE food, the proponents of these products have unjustly attacked — and deceptively described — this research. Indeed, the well-documented (and irrefutable) fact that the evidence has been systematically misrepresented attests to how strongly it raises legitimate concerns, because if it were truly supportive of safety, there would have been no need to distort it... [continued at https://research.ncsu.edu/ges/events/steven-druker/]

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  • GES Colloquium: Steven Druker - How the Health Risks of GMOs Have Been Systematically Misrepresented: The Biggest but Most Overlooked Issue in Bioethics

    October 10, 2017 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    1911 Building, Room 129, Current Drive, Raleigh, NC, United States

    Guest speaker Steven Druker discusses his book Altered Genes, Twisted Facts, which asserts "that the venture to employ genetic engineering technology in food production has been chronically dependent on misrepresentation. Basic facts of biology (and about the technology itself) have been untruthfully portrayed; false claims have been issued by scientists, scientific institutions, and government agencies; unsettling evidence has been suppressed or significantly distorted; and scientists who performed the research that produced the evidence have been unjustly attacked, defamed, and demoted."

    Full abstract attached or download at https://research.ncsu.edu/ges/files/2017/10/NCSU-Colloquium_Description-of-Druker-Presentation.pdf

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  • GES Fall Colloquium: Keith Edmisten - The Adoption of Biotech in Cotton Production

    October 17, 2017 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    1911 Building, Room 129, Current Drive, Raleigh, NC, United States

    ABSTRACT: Cotton producers - both in North Carolina and across the U.S. - were early adopters of biotech. The cotton industry has widely employed the use of insect resistant and herbicide tolerant varieties, evolving the variety of traits and management strategies along the way. Producers have experienced both pros and cons in this evolution.

    Dr. Edmisten will present some of the issues producers have faced, and some of the solutions industry and growers have adopted. He will also discuss why growers embraced the technologies in such a wholesale manner, and why they continue to use them. 

    --------------------

    Dr. Keith Edmisten is a Professor of Crop and Soil Sciences, and serves as the Extension Cotton Specialist for the NCSU Crop Science & Soil Sciences Department. 

    Prior to joining the Crop Science faculty here at NC State in 1992, Keith served on the faculty at Mississippi State University and Auburn University. He conducts applied cotton and industrial hemp agronomic research and cotton germplasm evaluation to include evaluation of new events, traits and elite varieties. He  teaches CS224 Seeds, Biotechnology and Society, CS 216 Southern Row Crop Production, and CS590 Intro to Regulatory Affairs and also advises the Plant and Soil Science biotechnology concentration undergraduate students. He was selected as the Extension Cotton Specialist of the year in 1997 and the Cotton Physiologist of the year in 2015. 

    Keith received his BS from NC State University in Agronomy, MS from NC State in Crop Science and Ph.D. from Virginia Tech in Crop Physiology in 1987.

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  • GES Colloquium - Rene Valdez: Perceptions of De-extinction Among Experts and in the News Media

    October 24, 2017 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    1911 Building, Room 129, Current Drive, Raleigh, NC, United States

    De-extinction is the re-creation of extinct species using methods from synthetic biology, cloning, genetic engineering, reproduction technologies, and stem cell research. Researchers around the world are investigating the possibility of reviving species, including the woolly mammoth, passenger pigeon, and gastric-brooding frog. These efforts have drawn considerable attention from scholars and the media.

    Advocates argue that returning extinct species will restore ecological functions and increase interest in conservation efforts. Others question whether de-extinct species can survive in contemporary ecosystems, if there are appropriate policies to govern de-extinction, and how broader publics will receive de-extinction.

    In this presentation I will examine perceptions of de-extinction, drawing on results from two studies. First, I'll present results from a study of synthetic biology experts, focusing on their perceptions of potential hazards, benefits, research and governance needs, and public reactions. I will then present results of a content analysis of news articles covering de-extinction. I will discuss how the news media compares de-extinction to science fiction, and their interpretations of technological inevitability and biotechnology policy. I will conclude by comparing results from both studies to highlight differences and similarities regarding potential policy and public reactions.

    Further Reading:
    The NGO Revive and Restore is on the forefront of de-extinction research
    - http://reviverestore.org/

    IUCN's Guiding Principles on Creating Proxies of Extinct Species for Conservation Benefit
    - https://portals.iucn.org/library/sites/library/files/documents/Rep-2016-009.pdf

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  • GES Colloquium - Tom Wedegaertner, Cotton Inc: Ultra Low Gosspyol Cottonseed

    October 31, 2017 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    1911 Building, Room 129, Current Drive, Raleigh, NC, United States

    Ultra-Low Gossypol Cottonseed Will Transform Cottonseed Utilization and Value

    Many plants use chemical defense mechanisms to reduce or eliminate predation and the cotton plant is no exception. Gossypol, a naturally occurring noxious compound, found in pigment glands located throughout the cotton plant, is an effective insect deterrent and a cumulative toxin in animals. The elimination of gossypol allows cottonseed protein to be used much more efficiently by using it in food products for direct consumption by humans, rather than feeding it to inefficient cattle. The worldwide production of cottonseed protein is about 11 million tons. This is a massive amount of underutilized protein. Without gossypol, this is enough protein to satisfy the daily, basic protein needs (50 grams/person) of more than 600 million people for one year. Cotton is uniquely suited to serve as a source of both food and fiber for an ever increasing world population.

    Modern plant biotechnology (RNAi and a seed specific promoter) has produced a genetically-enhanced cotton plant that has gossypol production silenced in the seed while retaining normal levels in all other plant tissues. This allows the plant to retain its natural defense mechanism against insects, but at the same time creates a seed that is safe for human and animal consumption. Deregulation by various agencies must happen before companies can commercialize new plant traits that were created with transgenic technology. This is perceived to be a huge and complicated barrier to commercialization of biotechnology innovations. Navigating the regulatory process in the U.S. is not as onerous as its perception.

    Tom on ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/T_Wedegaertner/contributions

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  • GES Colloquium - Eli Hornstein: Genetically engineering a multi-organism relationship

    November 7, 2017 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    1911 Building, Room 129, Current Drive, Raleigh, NC, United States

    Title: Genetically engineering a multi-organism relationship

    Presenter: Eli Hornstein, Provost Doctoral Fellow, Systems and Synthetic Biology, Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology

    Abstract: Biotechnology has great potential as a tool to address pressing issues beyond the agricultural applications in wide use today. In the context of environmental conservation, I will discuss how biotechnology could provide solutions to problems that have been intractable to traditional approaches for decades. I will focus the majority of my talk on my research in progress to genetically engineer crop plants to form new symbiotic relationships with soil fungi, called mycorrhizae. Ability to form or alter mycorrhizae in agriculture can greatly increase the uptake of soil N, P, K, and water. This in turn has potential to reduce fertilizer application, and ease consumption of land and water. I will discuss the inherent challenges of manipulating a complex relationship that varies across interactions between multiple organisms and their environment, as well as the potential challenges of proposing to deregulate such an engineered product.

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  • Public Lecture: Sarah Evanega - Hunger & Hypocrisy: A Climate for (GMO) Change

    November 13, 2017 | 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
    Thomas Hall, Raleigh, NC 27607, USA

    Stephens Room - 3503 Thomas Hall, NC State, Raleigh, NC
    Map: https://goo.gl/maps/SJRxVPGxqbP2

    Sarah Davidson Evanega, PhD
    Director, Cornell Alliance for Science - https://allianceforscience.cornell.edu/
    Sr. Associate Director, International Programs CALS, Cornell University

    Hunger & Hypocrisy: A Climate for GMO Change
    The world currently faces the great challenge of feeding a growing population while simultaneously minimizing agriculture’s negative impact on global climate change. In this talk I will share examples of how the tools of agricultural biotechnology are being employed to help address this and associated urgent challenges. We will explore how access to biotechnologies addresses injustices to the poor and other social problems in countries like Bangladesh. We will also discuss how applications of biotechnology may help lessen agriculture’s carbon emissions and other deleterious environmental impacts. Finally, we will explore how denying GMO science challenges a liberal worldview and obfuscates shared values around achieving justice for the poor, and address the critical need to defend evidence-based science in a time of unprecedented urgency.

    Register at - https://research.ncsu.edu/ges/events/

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  • GES Colloquium - Sarah Evanega - Empowering Champions, Embracing Advocacy: The Cornell Alliance for Science

    November 14, 2017 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    1911 Building, Room 129, Current Drive, Raleigh, NC, United States

    Sarah Davidson Evanega, PhD
    Director, Cornell Alliance for Science - https://allianceforscience.cornell.edu/
    Sr. Associate Director, International Programs CALS, Cornell University

    Solutions to hunger, poverty, and sustainable agricultural growth are often inaccessible to Less Developed Countries (LDCs), where they are needed the most. The Cornell Alliance for Science is a global communications initiative committed to ensuring access to scientific innovation as a means of addressing these pressing issues.

    By connecting a global grassroots network of “Science Allies” — researchers, farmers, policy makers, communicators, and other stakeholders all committed to our shared mission — the Alliance applies innovative communications approaches to positively shift the conversation around agricultural biotechnology.

    The Alliance for Science trains passionate advocates who work to ensure that the people in their countries have access to agricultural biotechnology innovations. Trainees are equipped with skills necessary to lead campaigns in support of biotechnology that target specific obstacles in their home countries and social contexts. They become part of a growing global network of collaborative Science Allies who are actively working toward achieving justice for the poor.

    In this session, Alliance for Science Director Sarah Evanega will introduce the organization’s mission, activities, and highlights of the training programs with hopes of exploring opportunities for collaboration.

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  • Listen to Todd Kuiken on WUNC, The State of Things

    November 28, 2017 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    1911 Building, 1911 Bldg, 10 Current Dr, Raleigh, NC 27607, USA

    Join us in our regular Colloquium space, room 129 in the 1911 Building, to listen to and discuss Todd's interview on WUNC. BYO Lunch!
    Livestream: http://wunc.org/programs/state-things#stream/0
    → GES Scholar Dr. Todd Kuiken will join Frank Stasio for a conversation about the latest research into synthetic biology, some of the opportunities these technologies present, potential drawbacks and conversations we are or should be having about their regulation.

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  • GES Internal Advisory Committee Meeting

    February 12, 2018 | 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    James B. Hunt Jr. Library, 1070 Partners Way, Raleigh, NC 27606, USA

    Details and room to be determined.

    Contact Sharon Stauffer at sastauff@ncsu.edu or 919-515-2596 with questions.

    ----------------------------------------------------
    ​Genetic Engineering and Society Center
    Phone: 919.515.2596
    Web: https://research.ncsu.edu/ges
    Twitter: @GESCenterNCSU

    James B. Hunt, Jr. Library
    1070 Partners Way, 5th floor
    Campus Box 7565
    Raleigh, NC 27695-7565

    All electronic mail messages in connection with State business which are sent to or received by this account are subject to the NC Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.

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Past Events: Pre-2017

DateEvent
October 2016Kongming Wu: Genetically Engineered Crops in China
October 2016Presentation: Kuzma J. Hubris or Humility in the Regulatory Assessment of Gene Drives?
Gene Editing: Life and Law Beyond the Human
SUNY-Buffalo, NSF-funded workshop
October 21-22, 2016.
October 2016Presentation: Kuzma, J. Gene Editing and Emerging Issues
Agree Initiative
Meridian Institute, DC. October 10, 2016.
October 2016Presentation: Kuzma, J. Governance for Engineered Pests in Historical and Systems Contexts
Keynote for OECD Workshop on Environmental Release of Engineered Pests: Building an International Governance Framework
Raleigh, NC October 6, 2016.
September 2016The GES Center hosted a Building with Biology event on September 19th. Read a report on the event. Download PDF
September 2016Nick Storer from Dow Agro gave a talk titled “Implementing resistance management for insect-protected genetically-engineered crops: a balancing act” on September 12th.
September 2016The GES Center hosted a Building with Biology event on September 19th that featured fun synbio activities.
September 2016Presentation: Delborne J. Institute for Science, Society and Policy Panel Series
Challenges of Governing Advances in Gene Editing
Ottawa, Canada, September 28, 2016
Watch Online
September 2016Presentation: Kuzma, J. Innovation in Governance
North Carolina Agricultural Biotechnology Summit
September 27, 2016
September 2016Presentation: Kuzma, J. Anticipatory governance of gene drives.
International Congress of Entomology.
Orlando, FL, September 26, 2016.
August 2016Scott Johnson spoke on agriculture biotech business activity on August 30th.
August 2016On August 22nd Jeff Powell (Yale University) gave a talk titled, ‘Evolutionary Genetics and Vector Biology: Aedes aegypti, the yellow fever mosquito.’ Aedes aegypti is the mosquito that has been associated with transmission of Zika virus. Jeff has been involved in studies of Aedes aegypti in the Florida Keys where there are proposed releases of transgenic Aedes.
May – June 2016Over the summer, NCSU held a Biolunch Seminar series, in which graduates and post-docs pursuing bio-related research made 15 minute presentations on Wednesdays of each week. Biolunch had thirteen meetings between May 16th and August 10th. It received funding this year through the NC State Office of Research, Innovation and Economic Development (ORIED) to bring in invited outside speakers and provide food during sessions.
May – June 2016Dr. Paul Thomas from the University of Adelaide visited on June 9th and gave a presentaion titled Modifying the Mouse Genome Using CRISPR/CAS9 for Disease Modelling and Pest Control. Dr. Thomas is Director of the South Australia Genome Editing Facility at the University of Adelaide is using genome modification to address problems in health research including neurodevelopmental disorders. He is also interested in innovative approaches to controlling rodent pests using genome editing
April 2016Genetic Engineering and You: GE Day 2016 – This event included activities and seminars in the NC Museum of Natural Sciences and a visit from Timothy Caulfield, a Canada Research Chair in Health Law and Policy, Professor in the Faculty of Law and the School of Public Health, and Research Director of the Health Law Institute at the University of Alberta.
April 2016Katharine Hayhoe– Facts Are Not Enough: Why Does a Climate Scientist Care about a Faith Based Response to the Impacts of Climate Change?
April 2016The Science of Belief with Keynote Speaker Dr. Aaron Kay
April 2016George Hess: Killing for Conversation
April 2016Presentation: Berube D. HPU Presidential Lecture Series on Global Leadership and Sustainability.
Emerging Technologies, Energy, and Public Engagement
Hawaii Pacific University, April 18, 2016.
April 2016Presentation: Kuzma J. and Vogel K. Massachusetts Society for Medical Research
THREE Is Conference
Chapel Hill, NC. April 14, 2016.
March 2016Heike Sederoff:”Redesigning Carbon Dioxide Assimilation in Plants”
March 2016Karl Campbell “A Collaborative Project to Evaluate the Potential for Genetically Engineered Mice in Island Restoration.”
March 2016Jack Bobo, Intrexon Corporation: Can Agriculture Save the Planet Before it Destroys It?
March 2016Laura Privalle: Ag Biotech Crops – Are they worth the hype – a Retrospective
March 2016The Science of Shale Gas/Oil: The Latest Evidence on Leaky Wells and Methane Emissions, and Implications for Energy Policy
March 2016Jose Ragas: Fingerprints for the Revolution: Biometrics, “Captahuellas,” and Resistance in Venezuela
March 2016The Story Behind The Story With Award-Winning NY Times Journalist Gina Kolata
March 2016Molly Hartzog, Thesis defense:Inventing Mosquitoes: Digital Organisms as Rhetorical Boundary Objects in Genetic Pest Management for Dengue and Malaria Control
March 2016Open Science Unconference
March 2016Nick Haddad: The critical role of advocacy and lobbying for faculty and students in our program
March 2016Emerging Plant Disease and Global Food Security Symposium
February 2016Todd Kuiken: Our Collective Biology: Enabling public science to build an ecosystem of makers in biology
February 2016Minorities in STEM: Empowering the Next Generation Distinguished speaker, Freeman A. Hrabowski, President, UMBC led a conversation on race, STEM education, and academic success. Colloquium: The politics of transgenic organisms in Europe and the prospects of GM insects. Speakers Javier Lezaun and Christian de Koning, members of The Institute for Science, Innovation and Society at Oxford.
February 2016Erin Brockovich – What does environmental justice really look like? Screening of the film Erin Brokovich and a conversation with experts in law and the environment.
February 2016The Global Eradication of Malaria. Ms. Deborah Derrick, President of Friends of the Global Fight Against Aids, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, shared two decades worth of insight on the eradication of malaria through international and developmental policy.
February 2016Innovations in Plant Breeding Symposium
February 2016Jen Baltzegar and Nicole Gutzmann, NCSU IGERT Fellows, led a discussion of a recent article by Nathanael Johnson titled WTF IS A GMO? It’s practically impossible to define “GMOs”
February 2016Gregor Wolbring: From precision knowledge to precision genetic interventions: Role of and impact on disabled people University of Calgary Past
February 2016Periodic Tables: A World Without Chocolate? With Lloyd Timberlake
February 2016S&S Roundtable: An Underwhelming Overhaul? The Proposed Changes to Rules for Human Subjects Research. With Dr. Jessica D Tenenbaum
February 2016Presentation: Kuzma J. NCSU Jefferson Scholars.
Raleigh, NC. February 8, 2016
January 2016Colloquium – Craig Yencho: Sweet Potato Breeding for Developing Countries: Craig and NCSU received $12.4 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to improve sweet potato as an important food staple in sub-Saharan Africa – the sweet potato. The grant is funding work to develop modern genomic, genetic and bioinformatics tools to improve the crop’s ability to resist diseases and insects and tolerate drought and heat.
January 2016Plant Phenotyping at North Carolina Biotechnology Center
January 2016To Test or Not To Test: Ethical Decision-Making & Genetic Diseases. Dr. Jeff Carroll discussed the challenges and ethical questions around patient autonomy, genetic testing, and the search for a cure for Huntington’s Disease, a dominant, fatal, neurodegenerative disease.
January 2016Evolution – Why Should You Care? Evolution is considered the foundation for the study of life, yet polls suggest only 1 out of 5 Americans accept it as fact. Professor Mohamed Noor discussed evolution, the evidence for it, what it means for humanity, and how it can affect our health.
January 2016Colloquium – Joe Herkert: Ethics Education in Science and Engineering. Joe’s presentation gave a brief overview of some contemporary issues in teaching engineering ethics and in engineering ethics research. In particular, the presentation focused on developments in macroethics and the unique challenges of emerging technologies (including synthetic biology). Ongoing improvements to the National Academy of Engineering’s Online Ethics Center for Engineering and Science (onlineethics.org) was also be discussed.
January 2016GMOs and the Future of the Global Food Supply and Medical Innovations. Jennifer Kuzma, and Robert T. Fraley, Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of Monsanto, discussed the risks and benefits associated with GMO science.
January 2016Presentation: Kuzma J. CATO Institute. GMOs and the Future of the Global Food Supply and Medical Innovations.
Washington, DC. January 20, 2016
December 2015On December 17, the NC Museum of Natural Sciences is held a Science Spelling Bee as part of its Thursday Night Science Cafe Program.
December 2015John Burness, visiting professor of the Practice in the Sanford School of Public Policy, discussed how we can create a more informed future at the Science and Society Roundtable – Missed Information: Public Distrust of Science on December 3rd.
December 2015Pints of Science is finished out the fall semester with New York Times bestselling author and research scientist in the Department of Evolutionary Anthropology at Duke University, Vanessa Woods. Her talk was entitled “How Domesticated Are You? What Dogs, Bonobos, and Bigfoot Can Tell You About Yourself.”
December 2015Science Comedian Brian Malow hosted Periodic Tables: Rational Comedy for an Irrational Planet, an informal science gathering during which invited speakers share interesting, relevant science to the general public in an engaging and interactive way.
December 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. Is regulatory harmonization desirable for gene edited animals?
National Academy of Sciences, A Workshop of the Roundtable on Science and Welfare in Laboratory Animal Use Gene Editing to Modify Animal Genomes for Research – Scientific and Ethical Considerations. Washington, DC. December 7-8, 2015.
December 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. Mental models & systems mapping for risk analysis of gene drives.
Society for Risk Analysis Annual Meeting.
Washington, DC. Dec 7-10, 2015.
October 2015History Project speaker Greg Jaffe presented a talk called Busting the Myths About Genetically Engineered Foods on October 5th. This talk cut through the rhetoric espoused by proponents and opponents of GE crops and provide the facts surrounding the current GE crops grown in the United States. Jaffe brought the Center for Science in the Public Interest’s unique science-based consumer perspective to this topic in a way that was informative and relevant to academics at NC State as well as everyday consumers.
October 2015Wendell Wallach from Yale University’s Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics presented a talk that shared its self-explanatory title with his latest book, A Dangerous Master: How to Keep Technology from Slipping Beyond Our Control.
October 2015Dr. Paul Thompson, W.K. Kellogg Chair in Agricultural Food and Community Ethics at Michigan State University, gave a talk called Social Amplification of GMO Risks. Thompson is the author of 13 books and editions and has served on many national and international committees on agricultural biotechnology.
October 2015NC State’s School of International Affairs had a PopMED seminar titled Genetic Engineering: A new Phase of Policy Perception led by Jennifer Kuzma.
October 2015Pam Marrone, CEO and founder of Marrone Bio Innovations, gave a talk called Enhancing Pest Management Programs Through Integration of Biological Pesticides on October 26th.
October 2015Jennifer Kuzma made a presentation atthe Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions’ tenth anniversary forum “Leadership in a Time of Rapid Change: Envisioning Solutions to Environmental Challenges.”
October 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. Designing a Regulatory System that Adapts to Emerging Risks, Technologies
Leadership in a Time of Rapid Change: Envisioning Solutions to Environmental Challenges.
Duke University Nicholas School 10th Anniversary Forum. October 22, 2015.

Professor Kuzma spoke at the 10th Anniversary workshop of the Nicholas School on the Environment at Duke University on October 22nd on Designing a Regulatory System that Adapts to Emerging Risks, Technologies. In the audience were former, high-level government officials, like the 1st administrator of EPA, company executives, and academics from all over the United States and abroad. Her talk explored principles for the design of more dyanmic and adpative oversight systems for second generation genetic engineering technologies like gene drives and gene editing.
October 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. and JP Roberts Transformation or Adaptation: Active Nanomaterials and Risk Governance.
Workshop paper for “Next Generation Nano Governance.”
American Chemical Society, CNS-ASU, and Notre Dame NSF funded workshop. Washington DC October 9, 2015

Professor Kuzma spoke at a National Science Foundation-sponsored and invited,workshop in Washington DC on Oct. 9th, presenting a key paper on challenges for risk analysis from active nano-bio materials, such has delivery of RNA to regulate genes in nanoparticles and self-assembling DNA-based nanostructures, which was co-authored by Ph.D. Public Administration student John Patrick Roberts. Policy and regulatory decision makers from NSF, NIH, and EPA were in attendance, along with stakeholder groups from NGOs, think-tanks, and industry. The four invited papers are in review for a special edition of the Journal of Nanoparticle Research to appear in 2016.
October 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. Genetic Engineering: A New Phase of Policy and Perception.
Population Medicine Seminar.
Vet School, NCSU/UNC/Duke. October 5, 2015.
August 2015On Sunday, August 30th the GES faculty facilitated a Building with Biology event at Durham’s Museum of Life and Science which featured activites aimed at teaching the public about synthetic biology.
August 2015On Monday, August 31st Eric Sachs, the Environmental, Social and Economic Platform Lead for Monsanto company, kicked off the History Project’s Fall 2015 season. His talk was titled Moving Beyond the GMO Controversy: What To Do When Science Isn’t Enough?
July 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. A Delphi Study: Risk Data and Governance Needs for Environmental Applications of Synthetic Biology.
World Congress on Risk 2015.
Singapore. July 19-22.
June 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. No Hands at the Wheel? Gene Drives, Genetic Engineering, and Society.
Duke University,Periodic Tables.
Durham’s Science Café, June 25, 2015.
June 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. Risk and Media.
Biotechnology Literacy Project Boot camp.
Academics Review, U of FL, and Genetic Literacy Project workshop. University of CA-Davis. May 31-June 3, 2015.
May 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. Intergenerational Equity, Gene Drives, and Conceptions of Nature.
Governance of Emerging Technologies 3rd Annual Conference.
Arizona State University. May 26-28.
May 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. Gene Editing and Governance.
1st Annual Workshop on GE@NC State.
NCSU. April 28, 2015.
May 2015Presentation: Serr, M. Leitschuh, C. Stress,Sex, and Competition: Genetic and Behavioral Comparisons of Wild and Lab Mice.
Auburn University: Hood & Hill Lab Meeting.
April 2015On April 28th, the Genetic Engineering at NC State Symposium brought together leaders who are doing research on genetic engineering on NC State’s campus. They discussed their contributions and where they see the science and policy headed in the future. Speakers included Rodolphe Barriangou, Chase Beise, Zachary Brown, Jason Delborne, Ralph Dewey, Fred Gould, Jennifer Kuzma, Jorge, Piedrahita, Heike Sederoff, Gavin Williams, and Jeff Yoder.
April 2015Dr. Tony Shelton, International Professor in the Department of Entomology and Associate Director of International Programs from Cornell University, gave a public talk called Genetic Engineering in a Land Grant University on April 21st. View it here.
April 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. Ethical, Legal, and Regulatory Considerations.
New Genomic Solutions for Conservation Problems Workshop.
Long Now Foundation. Sausalito, CA. April 6-9 2015.
April 2015Presentation: Leitschuh, C. Serr, M. McGraw, L. Godwin, J. Island invaders: How island conditions alter the reproductive dynamics of wild house mice on the Farallon island.
Genetic Engineering Research at NC State Symposium.
April 2015Presentation: Jason Delborne, PhD. Public Attitudes, Perceptions, and Engagement in the Field of Genetic Modification.
Transgenics & Society Symposium.
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March 2015On March 12th and 13th, the GES Center hosted the USDA for a Stakeholder Workshop on Coexistence. Various distinguished names in the industry made presentations, including Secretary of Agriculture, Tom Vilsack. Vidoes from day one and day two of the workshop are available for viewing.
March 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. Anticipatory Governance for Synthetic Biology: A Delphi Study.
GES colloquium, NCSU, March 24, 2015.
March 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. Gene Drives: Who’s behind the wheel?
Yale Bioethics Seminar. March 3, 2015.
March 2015Presentation: Booker M. San Francisco Bay’s Edible Past as a Problem for Scientists and Historians.
John Muir Institute of the Environment, UC Davis: Ecology and Evolution Seminar.
March 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. GM Food Safety
Women’s Conference of National Farm Bureau.
March 28, 2015.
February 2015Dr. Ignacio Chapela, Associate Professor from UC Berkeley, best known for a 2001 paper in Nature on the flow of transgenes into wild maize populations and as an outspoken critic of the University of California’s ties to the biotechnology industry, spoke about his experiences on Tuesday, February 24th. Watch the public talk here.
February 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. Ethics and genetically engineered organisms.
Duke Science and Society seminar, Feb. 25, 2015.
February 2015Presentation: Serr, M. Leitschuh, C. McGraw, L. Godwin, J. City mouse meets country mouse: mating of wild and laboratory mouse strains.
W.M. Keck Center for Behavioral Biology.
January 2015Documentary Series: This year, the GES Center partnered with the Science, Technology, and Society (STS) program to host a series of documentary screenings. Films in the series present a variety of views on the subject of genetic engineering and screenings are followed by a discussion lead by a panel of scientists and officials.
January 2015January 29, 2015: Percy Schmeiser: David versus Monsanto with panelists Dr. Keith Edmisten and Dr. Kultaran Chohan.
January 2015March 26, 2015: The Hunt for Life with panelists Dr. Mary Schweitzer and Dr. Russell Powell
January 2015Presentation: Kuzma J. GE Food Safety and Public Perception.
For “Finding Common Ground: The GM Food Labeling Paradox.”
University of MN, January 16, 2015.
January 2015Presentation: Delborne, J. Engaging Publics in Science and Technology.
When Science and Citizens Connect: Public Engagement on Genetically Modified Organisms.
A Workshop of the Roundtable on Public Interfaces of the Life Sciences.
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