Curating Art and Science: Art’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology

March 25, 2019 | Patti Mulligan

Hannah Star Rogers, March 25, 2019 | Resurrecting the Sublime is a synthetic biology based artwork which presents the scents of extinct plants, produced through a combination of techniques, materials, and ideas from art and biotechnology. This work will be installed as part of the Art's Work/Genetic Futures exhibit in the fall of 2019....

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Sustainability as a Framework for Considering Gene Drive Mice for Invasive Rodent Eradication

March 6, 2019 | Patti Mulligan

March 4, 2019 | Sustainability as a Framework for Considering Gene Drive Mice for Invasive Rodent Eradication, by S. Kathleen Barnhill-Dilling, Megan Serr, Dimitri V. Blondel and John Godwin. Abstract: Gene drives represent a dynamic and controversial set of technologies with applications that range from mosquito control to the conservation of biological diversity on islands. Currently, gene drives are being developed in mice that may one day serve as an important tool for reducing invasive rodent pests, a key threat to island biodiversity and economies. ...

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Jason Delborne

2018-19 University Faculty Scholars Named

February 27, 2019 | Patti Mulligan

NC State’s 2018-19 class of University Faculty Scholars was announced today. These 20 early- and mid-career faculty [including GES Center Executive Committee Member, Jason Delborne] receive this designation due to their significant academic achievements and contributions to NC State through their teaching, research and community engagement....

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NASEM Sackler SciComm: The promise and perils of gene drives

January 15, 2019 | Patti Mulligan

In November of 2017, an interdisciplinary panel discussed the complexities of gene drive applications as part of the third Sackler Colloquium on “The Science of Science Communication.” This paper builds on the ideas and conversations from the session to provide a more nuanced discussion about the context surrounding responsible communication and decision-making for cases of post-normal science. Deciding to use gene drives to control and suppress pests will involve more than a technical assessment of the risks involved, and responsible decision-making regarding their use will require concerted efforts from multiple actors....

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WP: Gene-edited farm animals are coming. Will we eat them?

December 18, 2018 | Patti Mulligan

“We’re at this inflection point in society, where gene editing is really taking off, and now is the time we could have a more sustained public conversation about how we want it used in our world and how we don’t want it to be used,” said Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. “All the polls indicate that people are less comfortable with animal biotechnology than plant biotechnology... A regulatory system cannot be based 100 percent on science or scientific risk, and values come into play when setting the standards.”...

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Photo of Dr. Jennifer Kuzma, Co-Director of the GES Center

GES Center Co-director Jennifer Kuzma Named AAAS Fellow

November 27, 2018 | Patti Mulligan

Jennifer Kuzma, Goodnight-North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation Distinguished Professor in Social Sciences and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NC State, elected for distinguished translational work in bridging the bench and society, advancing anticipatory governance of new technologies, and contributions to methods for oversight policy analysis....

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GES Center Co-director Dr. Jennifer Kuzma discussing gene edited foods.

AP: Kuzma discusses need for case-by-case scrutiny of gene-edited foods

November 14, 2018 | Patti Mulligan

Per Kuzma, companies will have to be up-front about how these new foods were made and the evidence that they’re healthy. She wants regulators to decide case-by-case which changes are no big deal and which might need more scrutiny.“Most gene-edited plants and animals are probably going to be just fine to eat. But you’re only going to do yourself a disservice in the long run if you hide behind the terminology,” Kuzma said....

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Editing nature: Local roots of global governance

November 1, 2018 | Patti Mulligan

Dr. Jennifer Kuzma, Goodnight-NC GSK Foundation Distinguished Professor and Co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, was one of the lead authors on an interdisciplinary team calling for global oversight of environmental gene editing in this Science Policy Forum, Editing Nature: Local roots of global governance....

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The Problems Driving Resistance to Bt Crops—and Some Proposed Solutions

October 26, 2018 | Patti Mulligan

By: DOMINIC REISIG, Entomology Today | Bt crops—those genetically engineered to produce an insecticidal toxin from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis—are special due to their benefits: reducing foliar insecticide applications, which increase populations of beneficial insects and minimize environmental harm; reducing pest populations throughout the landscape; and preserving yield, to name a few. Therefore, preventing resistance to Bt crops is important and is usually formalized in a set of Insecticide Resistance Management (IRM) practices. Because bollworm is now resistant to two Bt toxin families in cotton, IRM practices may have to change to slow resistance to other Bt toxins....

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Report: Biotechnology, the American Chestnut, and Public Engagement

October 25, 2018 | Patti Mulligan

In April 2018, a team of NC State faculty and students convened a stakeholder workshop to explore opportunities for public engagement surrounding the development, regulatory review, and potential deployment of a genetically engineered American chestnut tree. As perhaps the first GMO designed to spread and persist in the wild, the tree has the potential to restore a functionally extinct species, but also raises important ethical, political, ecological, and cultural questions. This report describes the workshop and its purpose, details the substance of the discussions, and offers the research team’s perspective on lessons learned and ways forward....

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‘Changing the Landscape of Graduate Education’

September 6, 2018 | Patti Mulligan

GES Center to launch NSF-funded AgBioFEWS graduate program, blending natural and social sciences to train next-gen problem-solvers in agricultural biotechnology....

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Gould quoted in C&EN: Building bioethics into the future of life sciences innovation

August 27, 2018 | Patti Mulligan

Scientists who refuse to engage with ethicists and the public will find themselves at a disadvantage. “Just because you are a scientist and have invented something doesn’t mean you have authority over it,” says Fred Gould, an entomologist and co-director of the Genetic Engineering & Society Center at North Carolina State University. He points to the National Academies report’s advocacy of participatory decision-making. Resistance from the science community based on ethicists and the public not fully understanding the science wears thin, he says. “You are a pretty poor scientist if you can’t explain what these things are about to an ethicist,” he says....

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Roundup weed killer contains the pesticide glyphosate.

NBC News – Gould: Exposure levels determine toxicity of glyphosate

August 17, 2018 | Patti Mulligan

“With all things, it is the level of exposure that matters,” said Fred Gould, head of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. “The poison is in the concentration.”...

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Scientists have found a fast and cheap way to edit your food’s DNA

Washington Post: Kuzma calls for mandatory regulatory process for gene-edited foods

August 13, 2018 | Patti Mulligan

“We need a mandatory regulatory process: not just for scientific reasons, but for consumer and public confidence,” Kuzma said. “I think the vast majority of gene-edited foods are going to be as safe as their conventionally bred counterparts. But I don’t buy into the argument that’s true all the time for every crop.”...

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Art's Work in the Age of Biotechnology | open call for art

Call for art for 2019 “genetic futures” exhibit

August 9, 2018 | Patti Mulligan

open call for art | 2019 Genetic Futures exhibit | Now accepting proposals from artists, scientists, designers, and makers. The NCSU Libraries, NC State’s Genetic Engineering and Society Center (GES), and the Gregg Museum of Art & Design have issued a public call for art for the upcoming exhibition Art’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology: Shaping our Genetic Futures....

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