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GES Media Mentions
2/21/2024Savannah WoodmanThe TechnicianFred Gould, executive director of the academy, said the academy was created to be an interdisciplinary center that could bring the campus together.Fred Gould

Genetics and Genomics Academy offers unique courses to students

Savannah Woodman, The Technician | 2/21/2024

Fred Gould, executive director of the academy, said the academy was created to be an interdisciplinary center that could bring the campus together. • Read more »

2/19/2024Kristen FontanaGlobal One Health AcademyLast week, the Global One Health Academy along with the Genetics & Genomics Academy and the Genetic Engineering & Society Center, cohosted a workshop on Mentoring Skills for Graduate Students. This event is part of a series of monthly Interdisciplinary Professional Development Workshops to help graduate students prepare for a career in interdisciplinary research.

From Mentee to Mentor

Kristen Fontana, Global One Health Academy | 2/19/2024

Last week, the Global One Health Academy along with the Genetics & Genomics Academy and the Genetic Engineering & Society Center, cohosted a workshop on Mentoring Skills for Graduate Students. This event is part of a series of monthly Interdisciplinary Professional Development Workshops to help graduate students prepare for a career in interdisciplinary research. • Read more »

2/16/2024D’Lyn FordNC State CALS NewsMy book is going to be a crime scene investigation study. Who were the victims, the suspects and the many detectives that cracked the potato blight case?Jean Ristaino, Amanda Mainello-Land

Preventing the Next Plant Plague

D’Lyn Ford, NC State CALS News | 2/16/2024

My book is going to be a crime scene investigation study. Who were the victims, the suspects and the many detectives that cracked the potato blight case? • Read more »

2/14/2024Dee ShoreNC State CALS NewsNC State has been recognized as one of the universities with the highest number of students, faculty and administrators selected for both the U.S. Fulbright Student and Scholar Programs, including three GES faculty members and an AgBioFEWS Fellow.Jason Delborne, Jabeen Ahmad, Jean Ristaino, Nora Haenn

NC State Named a Fulbright Top Producing Institution

Dee Shore, NC State CALS News | 2/14/2024

NC State has been recognized as one of the universities with the highest number of students, faculty and administrators selected for both the U.S. Fulbright Student and Scholar Programs, including three GES faculty members and an AgBioFEWS Fellow. • Read more »

2/13/2024Dee ShoreNC State CALS NewsDoctoral candidate and AgBioFEWS Fellow Christopher Gillespie seeks a stronger, more racially equitable food system, and at NC State, he’s taking steps to achieve that.Christopher Gillespie

Envisioning a More Equitable Food System

Dee Shore, NC State CALS News | 2/13/2024

Doctoral candidate and AgBioFEWS Fellow Christopher Gillespie seeks a stronger, more racially equitable food system, and at NC State, he’s taking steps to achieve that. • Read more »

2/12/2024Sharon GreenthalBetter Homes & GardensJennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, is surprised that more studies haven't come out about the environmental risk of luminescent petunias. Possible disruption to plant and insect behavior because of the unnatural light is unclear. “It depends on how widely these are grown and whether they were to establish more wildly,” she told Wired.Jennifer Kuzma

Glow-In-the-Dark Flowers Are Coming This Spring: Meet the Firefly Petunia

Sharon Greenthal, Better Homes & Gardens | 2/12/2024

Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, is surprised that more studies haven't come out about the environmental risk of luminescent petunias. Possible disruption to plant and insect behavior because of the unnatural light is unclear. “It depends on how widely these are grown and whether they were to establish more wildly,” she told Wired. • Read more »

2/7/2024Dee ShoreNC State CALS NewsFor example, Eli Hornstein, who holds a Ph.D. from NC State in plant metabolic engineering, has started Elysia Creative Biology to help slow climate change by producing bioengineered crops that can be turned into feed that reduces the emission of methane, a greenhouse gas, from cows.Eli Hornstein

Starting Strong

Dee Shore, NC State CALS News | 2/7/2024

For example, Eli Hornstein, who holds a Ph.D. from NC State in plant metabolic engineering, has started Elysia Creative Biology to help slow climate change by producing bioengineered crops that can be turned into feed that reduces the emission of methane, a greenhouse gas, from cows. • Read more »

2/1/2024Christopher GillespieFederation of American ScientistsRecent failures of the federal regulatory system for biotechnology threaten public trust, and recent regulations have been criticized for their lack of transparency. As a result, cross-sector efforts aim not just to reimagine the bioeconomy but to create a coordinated regulatory system for it.Christopher Gillespie

A Matter Of Trust: Helping The Bioeconomy Reach Its Full Potential With Translational Governance

Christopher Gillespie, Federation of American Scientists | 2/1/2024

Recent failures of the federal regulatory system for biotechnology threaten public trust, and recent regulations have been criticized for their lack of transparency. As a result, cross-sector efforts aim not just to reimagine the bioeconomy but to create a coordinated regulatory system for it. • Read more »

1/29/2024Alan YuWHYY–PBSAfter the 2016 outbreak, Penn State researchers [including AgBioFEWS Fellow Amanda Mainello] collected samples from 26 potato fields in Pennsylvania to study the disease. They recently published their findings, where they managed to identify the specific types of bacteria responsible, some of which had not been identified in Pennsylvania before.Amanda Mainello

A disease wiped out a lot of Pennsylvania potatoes in 2016. Now research has found out how

Alan Yu, WHYY–PBS | 1/29/2024

After the 2016 outbreak, Penn State researchers [including AgBioFEWS Fellow Amanda Mainello] collected samples from 26 potato fields in Pennsylvania to study the disease. They recently published their findings, where they managed to identify the specific types of bacteria responsible, some of which had not been identified in Pennsylvania before. • Read more »

1/5/2024Jamie DucharmeTimeFred Gould, a professor of agriculture at NC State who chaired a 2016 NASEM report on genetically engineered crops, often leads educational sessions on GMOs. He likes to show a photograph of a supermarket produce section and ask how many of the vegetables in the picture are genetically modified. He gets lots of guesses as high as 90%—but the right answer is zero.Fred Gould

Are GMOs Safe? Breaking Down the Science of Science-ified Foods

Jamie Ducharme, Time | 1/5/2024

Fred Gould, a professor of agriculture at NC State who chaired a 2016 NASEM report on genetically engineered crops, often leads educational sessions on GMOs. He likes to show a photograph of a supermarket produce section and ask how many of the vegetables in the picture are genetically modified. He gets lots of guesses as high as 90%—but the right answer is zero. • Read more »

11/15/2023VideoPBS TerraIn this episode of Hungry Planet, North Carolina State University PhD student Modesta Abugu tells Niba about her research to make sweet potatoes more delicious by identifying the aromatic molecules that give rise to their complex flavor. Modesta Abugu

Sweet Potatoes' Flavor is More Complex Than You Think

Video, PBS Terra | 11/15/2023

In this episode of Hungry Planet, North Carolina State University PhD student Modesta Abugu tells Niba about her research to make sweet potatoes more delicious by identifying the aromatic molecules that give rise to their complex flavor. • Read more »

10/27/2023John HartSoutheast Farm PressKatie Barnhill is a senior research scholar with the GES Center at NC State. She has done extensive interviews with farmers on the use of microbiological crop production inoculants, and explained farmers remain hesitant, due to continued skepticism on the products’ efficacy. Katie Barnhill

Moving biologicals beyond ‘snake oil’

John Hart, Southeast Farm Press | 10/27/2023

Katie Barnhill is a senior research scholar with the GES Center at NC State. She has done extensive interviews with farmers on the use of microbiological crop production inoculants, and explained farmers remain hesitant, due to continued skepticism on the products’ efficacy. • Read more »

9/27/2023BiosketchNASEMFred Gould, North Carolina State UniversityPrimary Section: 61, Animal, Nutritional, and Applied Microbial Sciences
Secondary Section: 27, Evolutionary Biology
Membership Type: Member (elected 2011)
Fred Gould

National Academy of Sciences Member Directory: Fred Gould

Biosketch, NASEM | 9/27/2023

Fred Gould, North Carolina State UniversityPrimary Section: 61, Animal, Nutritional, and Applied Microbial Sciences
Secondary Section: 27, Evolutionary Biology
Membership Type: Member (elected 2011)
Read more »

9/19/2023Emily MullinWiredJennifer Kuzma, codirector of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, says she’s concerned that the agency didn’t conduct a more formal assessment of the plant’s potential environmental and ecological risks. Even though bioluminescence occurs naturally, glowing plants could affect the behavior of insects and animals that aren’t accustomed to it. “It depends on how widely these are grown and whether they were to establish more wildly,” she says.Jennifer Kuzma

Here Come the Glow-in-the-Dark Houseplants

Emily Mullin, Wired | 9/19/2023

Jennifer Kuzma, codirector of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, says she’s concerned that the agency didn’t conduct a more formal assessment of the plant’s potential environmental and ecological risks. Even though bioluminescence occurs naturally, glowing plants could affect the behavior of insects and animals that aren’t accustomed to it. “It depends on how widely these are grown and whether they were to establish more wildly,” she says. • Read more »

9/13/2023Maya L. KapoorGristAccording to Jason Delborne, who studies biotechnology and environmental policy at North Carolina State University, “There are people who are environmentalists at their core, but sick of losing, and interested in the promise of technology to solve the ecological and environmental problems we are facing.” Jason Delborne Katie Barnhill

The American chestnut tree is coming back. Who is it for?

Maya L. Kapoor, Grist | 9/13/2023

According to Jason Delborne, who studies biotechnology and environmental policy at North Carolina State University, “There are people who are environmentalists at their core, but sick of losing, and interested in the promise of technology to solve the ecological and environmental problems we are facing.” • Read more »

8/16/2023Zabrina J. BugnosenISAAA BlogWith the release of Executive Order 14801, the North Carolina State University experts [AgBioFEWS Fellows] see a window of opportunity to enhance visibility and encourage trust in the regulatory system. AgBioFEWS Fellows

Policy and Transparency: Increasing Public Trust in US Biotechnology Regulations

Zabrina J. Bugnosen, ISAAA Blog | 8/16/2023

With the release of Executive Order 14801, the North Carolina State University experts [AgBioFEWS Fellows] see a window of opportunity to enhance visibility and encourage trust in the regulatory system. • Read more »

7/12/2023Sam Gunnells NC State NewsThe Genetic Engineering and Society (GES) cluster grew into the GES Center and then — to fill the need for greater genetics literacy throughout the university — the Genetics and Genomics Academy was created.Jennifer Kuzma, Fred Gould

Faculty Clusters Fuel a Culture of Excellence at NC State

Sam Gunnells , NC State News | 7/12/2023

The Genetic Engineering and Society (GES) cluster grew into the GES Center and then — to fill the need for greater genetics literacy throughout the university — the Genetics and Genomics Academy was created. • Read more »

7/5/2023Matt ShipmanNC State News“If we want to develop systems and policies that ensure long-term sustainability of phosphorus resources, we have to understand the needs, wants and concerns of relevant stakeholders,” Grieger saysKhara Grieger

Is Our Phosphorus Use Sustainable? Most Stakeholders Doubt It

Matt Shipman, NC State News | 7/5/2023

“If we want to develop systems and policies that ensure long-term sustainability of phosphorus resources, we have to understand the needs, wants and concerns of relevant stakeholders,” Grieger says • Read more »

6/29/2023Heather FrankWORLDJennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, doesn’t suspect any safety issues with Pairwise’s mustard greens, but she echoed Hanson’s call for more transparency.Jennifer Kuzma

First CRISPR-edited salad hits the U.S. market

Heather Frank, WORLD | 6/29/2023

Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, doesn’t suspect any safety issues with Pairwise’s mustard greens, but she echoed Hanson’s call for more transparency. • Read more »

6/15/2023StaffOils and Fats InternationalAccording to NC State’s Kuzma, the EPA had struck a reasonable balance. “We need some sort of outside check to make sure that the industry is thinking about risks to non-target organisms and humans when it comes to pesticidal compounds.”Jennifer Kuzma

EPA publishes final rule on gene-edited plants

Staff, Oils and Fats International | 6/15/2023

According to NC State’s Kuzma, the EPA had struck a reasonable balance. “We need some sort of outside check to make sure that the industry is thinking about risks to non-target organisms and humans when it comes to pesticidal compounds.” • Read more »

6/2/2023Erik StokstadScienceThe move clarifies the regulatory requirements for industry and provides valuable oversight, says Jennifer Kuzma of North Carolina State University, an expert on biotechnology and public policy. Jennifer Kuzma

EPA decision to tighten oversight of gene-edited crops draws mixed response

Erik Stokstad, Science | 6/2/2023

The move clarifies the regulatory requirements for industry and provides valuable oversight, says Jennifer Kuzma of North Carolina State University, an expert on biotechnology and public policy. • Read more »

5/29/2023Dan CharlesScience—The WireScientists understood that the strategy could fail. In 1998, entomologist Fred Gould, at North Carolina State University, laid out some of its weaknesses in the Annual Review of Entomology. Fred Gould

The Ever-Tenuous Success of Plants Engineered To Kill Insect Foes

Dan Charles, Science—The Wire | 5/29/2023

Scientists understood that the strategy could fail. In 1998, entomologist Fred Gould, at North Carolina State University, laid out some of its weaknesses in the Annual Review of Entomology. • Read more »

5/16/2023Emily MullinWired"The direct-to-consumer benefit has not manifested in many technological food products in the past 30 years," says Cummings. "If gene-edited foods are really going to take off, they need to provide a clear and direct benefit to people that helps them financially or nutritionally." Christopher Cummings

The First Crispr-Edited Salad Is Here

Emily Mullin, Wired | 5/16/2023

"The direct-to-consumer benefit has not manifested in many technological food products in the past 30 years," says Cummings. "If gene-edited foods are really going to take off, they need to provide a clear and direct benefit to people that helps them financially or nutritionally." • Read more »

5/12/2023Christopher GillespieThe Equation (Union of Concerned Scientists)It is one thing for Congress to pass a law. It is entirely different thing for a federal agency to make a rule (in other words, regulations) in accordance with that law.Christopher Gillespie

I Don’t Make the Rules, I Comment on Them

Christopher Gillespie, The Equation (Union of Concerned Scientists) | 5/12/2023

It is one thing for Congress to pass a law. It is entirely different thing for a federal agency to make a rule (in other words, regulations) in accordance with that law. • Read more »

5/8/2023PodcastFindig GeniusHow are nanomaterials being used around us – and what are the potential risks? Khara D. Grieger, an Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist in Environmental Health and Risk Assessment at NC State, joins us to discuss this intriguing topic. With a Ph.D. in environmental engineering, Khara is interested in unpacking the uses and risks of nanotechnology in agriculture and food production. Drawing from her extensive knowledge of risk assessment, risk management, and stakeholder engagement, her research is truly ahead of its time…Khara Grieger

Nanomaterials Are In Our Food – Are They Safe? | An Expert Explains

Podcast, Findig Genius | 5/8/2023

How are nanomaterials being used around us – and what are the potential risks? Khara D. Grieger, an Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist in Environmental Health and Risk Assessment at NC State, joins us to discuss this intriguing topic. With a Ph.D. in environmental engineering, Khara is interested in unpacking the uses and risks of nanotechnology in agriculture and food production. Drawing from her extensive knowledge of risk assessment, risk management, and stakeholder engagement, her research is truly ahead of its time… • Read more »

5/2/2023Deborah StrangeNC State NewsThe Biotechnology Program (BIT) studies the molecular side of biotechnology, and the Genetic Engineering and Society Center (GES) examines societal implications of genetic engineering used in biomanufacturing. Together, these units offer a dynamic, interdisciplinary approach toJason Delborne, Katie Barnhill

NC State Partner Institutes Bolster U.S. Manufacturing Industry

Deborah Strange, NC State News | 5/2/2023

The Biotechnology Program (BIT) studies the molecular side of biotechnology, and the Genetic Engineering and Society Center (GES) examines societal implications of genetic engineering used in biomanufacturing. Together, these units offer a dynamic, interdisciplinary approach to • Read more »

4/27/2023Ruth Alexander, The Food Chain PodcastBBC World ServiceProfessor Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, talks about how labelling can help give consumers choice over whether they eat GM.Jennifer Kuzma

The growth of GM food

Ruth Alexander, The Food Chain Podcast, BBC World Service | 4/27/2023

Professor Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, talks about how labelling can help give consumers choice over whether they eat GM. • Read more »

4/24/2023EcoSense for Living PodcastPBSIn Galveston, Texas, coyotes dubbed "ghost wolves" carry high amounts of red wolf DNA that may help the population survive; groups consider whether they'll welcome American Chestnut trees engineered with a wheat gene to resist blight; mosquitoes modified to lower disease levels have met with resistance and concern in the Florida Keys. A conversation with Jason Delborne and Fred Gould of the GES Center at NC State University.Jason Delborne, Fred Gould

Messing with Mother Nature

EcoSense for Living Podcast, PBS | 4/24/2023

In Galveston, Texas, coyotes dubbed "ghost wolves" carry high amounts of red wolf DNA that may help the population survive; groups consider whether they'll welcome American Chestnut trees engineered with a wheat gene to resist blight; mosquitoes modified to lower disease levels have met with resistance and concern in the Florida Keys. A conversation with Jason Delborne and Fred Gould of the GES Center at NC State University. • Read more »

4/14/2023Amanda Rae Brucchieri and Robert Joseph Salerno University of Maryland, Department of EntomologyDr. Fred Gould, a distinguished professor of Entomology at North Carolina State University whose relationship with the University of Maryland extends back over 30 years, addressed a full hall about this shadowed intersection of science and society. In his talk, Gould dove into the 16-year ban of Mendelian genetics in the Soviet Union and the history that resulted in the ban’s conception. Fred Gould

[Seminar Blog] What Influences Your Science? A Case Study On Cultural, Political, and Scientific Entanglement

Amanda Rae Brucchieri and Robert Joseph Salerno , University of Maryland, Department of Entomology | 4/14/2023

Dr. Fred Gould, a distinguished professor of Entomology at North Carolina State University whose relationship with the University of Maryland extends back over 30 years, addressed a full hall about this shadowed intersection of science and society. In his talk, Gould dove into the 16-year ban of Mendelian genetics in the Soviet Union and the history that resulted in the ban’s conception. • Read more »

4/3/2023Mick KulikowskiNC State News“About 150 new Phytophthora species have been identified since 2000,” says NC State Ph.D. student Allison Coomber, who developed the tool with the team. “This is an unusually large number of plant pathogen species,” Ristaino said. “Many Phytophthora species have broad host ranges, so they can ‘move’ over wider areas.”Jean Ristaino, Allison Coomber

NC State Researchers Assemble Pathogen ‘Tree of Life’

Mick Kulikowski, NC State News | 4/3/2023

“About 150 new Phytophthora species have been identified since 2000,” says NC State Ph.D. student Allison Coomber, who developed the tool with the team. “This is an unusually large number of plant pathogen species,” Ristaino said. “Many Phytophthora species have broad host ranges, so they can ‘move’ over wider areas.” • Read more »

3/16/2023Kara CarlsonAustin American-StatesmanThe ethics of bringing back extinct animals has been a hot topic among scientists and people following de-exinction efforts. Delborne, a social scientist, said it's important to have conversations about who decides what gets brought back and why, and added there is no one right answer.Jason Delborne

Should we bring back the woolly mammoth? SXSW experts talk ethics behind de-extinction

Kara Carlson, Austin American-Statesman | 3/16/2023

The ethics of bringing back extinct animals has been a hot topic among scientists and people following de-exinction efforts. Delborne, a social scientist, said it's important to have conversations about who decides what gets brought back and why, and added there is no one right answer. • Read more »

2/19/2023Podcast + ArticleFutureBites with Dr. Bruce McCabeDesigner babies, agricultural mishaps, extinction via gene drive – all possible now that CRISPR has placed into our hands the awesome power to “edit life” in all its forms. So, how to keep the good while preventing the bad? How to safeguard our future? Is that even possible? I asked Jennifer Kuzma, global expert on biotech responsibility, to shed light on one of the most important governance challenges of our time:  how to put guardrails around CRISPR.Jennifer Kuzma

Can we keep CRISPR responsible? The Future of CRISPR with Jennifer Kuzma

Podcast + Article, FutureBites with Dr. Bruce McCabe | 2/19/2023

Designer babies, agricultural mishaps, extinction via gene drive – all possible now that CRISPR has placed into our hands the awesome power to “edit life” in all its forms. So, how to keep the good while preventing the bad? How to safeguard our future? Is that even possible? I asked Jennifer Kuzma, global expert on biotech responsibility, to shed light on one of the most important governance challenges of our time:  how to put guardrails around CRISPR. • Read more »

2/2/2023Emma Foehringer MerchantMIT Technology Review“Chemicals can only travel so far before they degrade in the environment,” says Jason Delborne, a professor of science, policy, and society at North Carolina State University. “If you introduce a gene-edited organism that can move through the environment, you have the potential to change or transform environments across a huge spatial and temporal scale.”Jason Delborne

How CRISPR could help save crops from devastation caused by pests

Emma Foehringer Merchant, MIT Technology Review | 2/2/2023

“Chemicals can only travel so far before they degrade in the environment,” says Jason Delborne, a professor of science, policy, and society at North Carolina State University. “If you introduce a gene-edited organism that can move through the environment, you have the potential to change or transform environments across a huge spatial and temporal scale.” • Read more »

11/17/2022Emma MacekNC State CALS Magazine“By engaging stakeholders within the early stages of technology development, stakeholder needs can be more easily met, food waste can be reduced, and social and environmental sustainability within the industry can be improved.” Khara GriegerKhara Grieger, Craig Yencho, Daniela Jones, Cranos Williams

Sweet-APPS Yielding Sweet Success

Emma Macek, NC State CALS Magazine | 11/17/2022

“By engaging stakeholders within the early stages of technology development, stakeholder needs can be more easily met, food waste can be reduced, and social and environmental sustainability within the industry can be improved.” Khara Grieger • Read more »

10/7/2022NC State CALS NewsModesta Abugu came to North Carolina State University from a smallholder farming community in Enugu State, located in southeastern Nigeria, where she grew up helping her mother on a two-acre farm planting, weeding and harvesting cassava, corn and cowpeas. Modesta Abugu

Modesta Abugu: Improving Sweetpotato Flavor for Nutrition Security

, NC State CALS News | 10/7/2022

Modesta Abugu came to North Carolina State University from a smallholder farming community in Enugu State, located in southeastern Nigeria, where she grew up helping her mother on a two-acre farm planting, weeding and harvesting cassava, corn and cowpeas. • Read more »

9/27/2022Jabeen AhmadFFARFood insecurity is a concern now and in the future. Globally, the United Nations estimates that about 690 million people are food insecure. By the year 2050, the world population is expected to reach nine billion people, requiring food supplies to double.Jabeen Ahmad

Archea, Microbial Superheroes?

Jabeen Ahmad, FFAR | 9/27/2022

Food insecurity is a concern now and in the future. Globally, the United Nations estimates that about 690 million people are food insecure. By the year 2050, the world population is expected to reach nine billion people, requiring food supplies to double. • Read more »

10/17/2022Joseph Opoku GakpoMy Joy OnlineAs we mark the day, I want to talk about what is probably the most significant food security-related development Ghana has witnessed since we celebrated the last World Food Day in October 2021. It has to do with genetically modified (GM) foods which are popularly known as GMOs.Joseph Opoku Gakpo

World Food Day: Revisiting the GMO conversation

Joseph Opoku Gakpo, My Joy Online | 10/17/2022

As we mark the day, I want to talk about what is probably the most significant food security-related development Ghana has witnessed since we celebrated the last World Food Day in October 2021. It has to do with genetically modified (GM) foods which are popularly known as GMOs. • Read more »

9/19/2022Jacqueline RowarthThe Country (New Zealand)"Much effort has been expended globally over the past four decades to craft and update country-specific and multinational safety regulations that can be applied to crops developed by genetic engineering processes while exempting conventionally bred crops. This differentiation made some sense in the 1980s, but in light of technological advances, it is no longer scientifically defensible."Fred Gould

Opinion: Time to reopen the GE in agriculture debate

Jacqueline Rowarth, The Country (New Zealand) | 9/19/2022

"Much effort has been expended globally over the past four decades to craft and update country-specific and multinational safety regulations that can be applied to crops developed by genetic engineering processes while exempting conventionally bred crops. This differentiation made some sense in the 1980s, but in light of technological advances, it is no longer scientifically defensible." • Read more »

9/13/2022Emily MullinWIREDFred Gould, codirector of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center of North Carolina State University, says it will be up to consumers to decide just how valuable a purple tomato is. After all, they can get anthocyanins from other sources—berries, eggplant, and cabbage, for instance.Fred Gould

A GMO Purple Tomato Is Coming to Grocery Aisles. Will the US Bite?

Emily Mullin, WIRED | 9/13/2022

Fred Gould, codirector of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center of North Carolina State University, says it will be up to consumers to decide just how valuable a purple tomato is. After all, they can get anthocyanins from other sources—berries, eggplant, and cabbage, for instance. • Read more »

8/10/2022StaffNSF NewsNSF Engineering Research Center for Precision Microbiome Engineering will create microbiome technologies that address challenges at the interface of human health and the built environment, promoting the proliferation of beneficial microorganisms and preventing colonization by infectious agents. Jennifer Kuzma

NSF announces 4 new Engineering Research Centers focused on agriculture, health, manufacturing and smart cities

Staff, NSF News | 8/10/2022

NSF Engineering Research Center for Precision Microbiome Engineering will create microbiome technologies that address challenges at the interface of human health and the built environment, promoting the proliferation of beneficial microorganisms and preventing colonization by infectious agents. • Read more »

8/10/2022Ken KingeryDuke University NewsJoining Gunsch on the PreMiEr leadership team are four distinguished faculty from neighboring North Carolina institutions: Jennifer Kuzma, the Goodnight-NCGSK Foundation Distinguished Professor in the School of Public and International Affairs and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NC StateJennifer Kuzma

Duke-led Center Seeks to Examine and Engineer the Microbial Communities of Indoor Spaces

Ken Kingery, Duke University News | 8/10/2022

Joining Gunsch on the PreMiEr leadership team are four distinguished faculty from neighboring North Carolina institutions: Jennifer Kuzma, the Goodnight-NCGSK Foundation Distinguished Professor in the School of Public and International Affairs and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NC State • Read more »

7/29/2022Deborah StrangeNC State NewsSaah coordinates programs that research and develop new technologies that prevent species extinction. NC State researchers, such as Fred Gould, have examined genetic technologies to remove invasive species from the Galapagos.Fred Gould, Royden Saah

NC State Brings Expertise, Interdisciplinarity to Galapagos Consortium

Deborah Strange, NC State News | 7/29/2022

Saah coordinates programs that research and develop new technologies that prevent species extinction. NC State researchers, such as Fred Gould, have examined genetic technologies to remove invasive species from the Galapagos. • Read more »

3/2/2022Matt SimpsonNC State NewsDelborne says that this is a “fantastic opportunity for the GES Center to contribute to an educational mission even as it prepares to work closely with the recently announced Genetics and Genomics Academy at NC State.”Jason Delborne, Katie Barnhill

NC State University Awarded BioMADE Funding to Advance U.S. Bioindustrial Manufacturing by Educating Future Workers

Matt Simpson, NC State News | 3/2/2022

Delborne says that this is a “fantastic opportunity for the GES Center to contribute to an educational mission even as it prepares to work closely with the recently announced Genetics and Genomics Academy at NC State.” • Read more »

2/23/2022Weed Science Society of AmericaOUTSTANDING TEACHER AWARD: Ramon Leon, Ph.D., North Carolina State UniversityRamon Leon

WSSA Announces 2022 Awards for Outstanding Achievements in Weed Science

, Weed Science Society of America | 2/23/2022

OUTSTANDING TEACHER AWARD: Ramon Leon, Ph.D., North Carolina State University • Read more »

2/22/2022Joseph Opoku GakpoAlliance for ScienceNigeria’s private local seed companies are expanding production of genetically modified (GM) cowpea seeds to supply farmers eager to grow the pest-resistant crop.Joseph Opoku Gakpo

Nigerian companies ramp up production to meet high demand for GMO cowpea seeds

Joseph Opoku Gakpo, Alliance for Science | 2/22/2022

Nigeria’s private local seed companies are expanding production of genetically modified (GM) cowpea seeds to supply farmers eager to grow the pest-resistant crop. • Read more »

2/10/2022Patti MulliganGES CenterKhara Grieger, together with GES Co-director Jennifer Kuzma, will lead a $650,000 project that will support the responsible development of novel agrifood technologies to contribute to more sustainable food and ag systems.Khara Grieger, Jennifer Kuzma

NC State receives USDA/NIFA grant to evaluate societal impacts and foster sustainability of GE and nanotech in agriculture

Patti Mulligan, GES Center | 2/10/2022

Khara Grieger, together with GES Co-director Jennifer Kuzma, will lead a $650,000 project that will support the responsible development of novel agrifood technologies to contribute to more sustainable food and ag systems. • Read more »

2/10/2022Deena TheresaInteresting EngineeringAdding to Barrangou's sentiment, Jennifer Kuzma, the Goodnight-NC GSK Foundation Distinguished Professor in the Social Sciences and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NC State, tells IE that a gene-edited crop that works in the lab or greenhouse needn't work in the field. "Another challenge is that farmers may not want to buy that particular gene-edited seed if it may not deliver enough benefits directly to them. Crops to mitigate climate change may not fit into their economic models," she says.Jennifer Kuzma

What is stopping gene-edited food from saving our planet?

Deena Theresa, Interesting Engineering | 2/10/2022

Adding to Barrangou's sentiment, Jennifer Kuzma, the Goodnight-NC GSK Foundation Distinguished Professor in the Social Sciences and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NC State, tells IE that a gene-edited crop that works in the lab or greenhouse needn't work in the field. "Another challenge is that farmers may not want to buy that particular gene-edited seed if it may not deliver enough benefits directly to them. Crops to mitigate climate change may not fit into their economic models," she says. • Read more »

2/3/2022Joseph Opoku GakpoAlliance for ScienceNassib Mugwanya, a former agricultural extension agent in Uganda who is now a doctoral candidate in agriculture and extension education at North Carolina State University, agreed. “GM crops in Uganda are rooted in the contextual realities of the challenges facing agriculture and smallholder farmers,” he observed. “And if anything, I think GM crops complement indigenous knowledge and agricultural solutions. They help smallholder farmers — especially women — spend less time in the fields as they grow more nutritious crops for the households and communities.”Joseph Opoku Gakpo, Nassib Mugwanya

Anti-GMO stances ‘insult smallholder farmers’ in Africa and Asia

Joseph Opoku Gakpo, Alliance for Science | 2/3/2022

Nassib Mugwanya, a former agricultural extension agent in Uganda who is now a doctoral candidate in agriculture and extension education at North Carolina State University, agreed. “GM crops in Uganda are rooted in the contextual realities of the challenges facing agriculture and smallholder farmers,” he observed. “And if anything, I think GM crops complement indigenous knowledge and agricultural solutions. They help smallholder farmers — especially women — spend less time in the fields as they grow more nutritious crops for the households and communities.” • Read more »

1/26/2022Andrew MooreNC State CNR News“As an interdisciplinary scholar who doesn’t fit neatly into traditional academic boxes, I’m really honored to have my contributions recognized by the premier science organization in the United States,” Delborne said.Jason Delborne

Two Professors Named 2021 AAAS Fellows

Andrew Moore, NC State CNR News | 1/26/2022

“As an interdisciplinary scholar who doesn’t fit neatly into traditional academic boxes, I’m really honored to have my contributions recognized by the premier science organization in the United States,” Delborne said. • Read more »

1/25/2022Abbey SlatteryWRAL.com"The RTP is one of the CRISPR hubs in the world, and we’ve had multiple CRISPR related startup companies. We are not just impacting science, technology and academia, but also making a real impact in the business world," said Barrangou.Rodolphe Barrangou, Jack Wang

How CRISPR is solving problems through DNA editing

Abbey Slattery, WRAL.com | 1/25/2022

"The RTP is one of the CRISPR hubs in the world, and we’ve had multiple CRISPR related startup companies. We are not just impacting science, technology and academia, but also making a real impact in the business world," said Barrangou. • Read more »

1/25/2022Modesta AbuguWomen in GenomicsDr. Martha Burford Reiskind is one of the female scientists who understands the difference mentorship makes for graduate students’ success and is working to change the system of academic mentorship in graduate school.Modesta Abugu, Martha Burford Reiskind

Excelling through mentorship: An interview with Dr. Martha Burford Reiskind

Modesta Abugu, Women in Genomics | 1/25/2022

Dr. Martha Burford Reiskind is one of the female scientists who understands the difference mentorship makes for graduate students’ success and is working to change the system of academic mentorship in graduate school. • Read more »

1/21/2022Marlo LeeLead Stories“The idea that RNA could be targeted specifically at Black people is even more unlikely,” (GES Co-director) Gould said…”there are no genetic distinctions between Black and white people. If the RNA could harm Black people, it would harm white people too.”Fred Gould

Fact Check: Genetic Engineers Have NOT Created Food That Makes Black People Infertile

Marlo Lee, Lead Stories | 1/21/2022

“The idea that RNA could be targeted specifically at Black people is even more unlikely,” (GES Co-director) Gould said…”there are no genetic distinctions between Black and white people. If the RNA could harm Black people, it would harm white people too.” • Read more »

1/14/2022Bre HolbertAg DailyFeatures photo of AgBioFEWS Fellow DeShae DillardDeShae Dillard

3 minority-serving agricultural programs for students to know about

Bre Holbert, Ag Daily | 1/14/2022

Features photo of AgBioFEWS Fellow DeShae Dillard • Read more »

1/12/2022Emily PackardNC State News“The Genetics and Genomics Academy will provide a wealth of opportunities for not just faculty, but also students to build their skills working with a diverse group within the university setting,” said Fred Gould, the academy’s executive director.Fred Gould

Advancing a Culture of Interdisciplinary Excellence

Emily Packard, NC State News | 1/12/2022

“The Genetics and Genomics Academy will provide a wealth of opportunities for not just faculty, but also students to build their skills working with a diverse group within the university setting,” said Fred Gould, the academy’s executive director. • Read more »

1/7/2022Kristin Sargent NC State CALS NewsResearch assistant professor Daniela Jones discovered her spark for solving problems as an industrial engineering student at Mississippi State University.Daniela Jones

Enhancing NC State’s Data-Driven, Climate-Smart Agriculture Talent Pool

Kristin Sargent , NC State CALS News | 1/7/2022

Research assistant professor Daniela Jones discovered her spark for solving problems as an industrial engineering student at Mississippi State University. • Read more »

11/10/2021Modesta AbuguGES CenterAgriculture is changing and so are the technologies needed to improve it. Scientists should be allowed to develop genetically modified (GM) crops to provide options for smallholder farmers who depend on a successful harvest for their livelihood.Modesta Abugu

Blog: Considerations for developing GMO crops around the world

Modesta Abugu, GES Center | 11/10/2021

Agriculture is changing and so are the technologies needed to improve it. Scientists should be allowed to develop genetically modified (GM) crops to provide options for smallholder farmers who depend on a successful harvest for their livelihood. • Read more »

11/8/2021Adriana Thalia Gonzales Del Carpio, Sebastián Zárate Vásquez and Amanda VilchezSociety for Social Studies of ScienceThe Second Peruvian STS Meeting was an opportunity to bring together experts and practitioners of science and technology communication, policy, and decision making.Sebastián Zárate

Science, Technology and Society Second Meeting – Peru 2021

Adriana Thalia Gonzales Del Carpio, Sebastián Zárate Vásquez and Amanda Vilchez, Society for Social Studies of Science | 11/8/2021

The Second Peruvian STS Meeting was an opportunity to bring together experts and practitioners of science and technology communication, policy, and decision making. • Read more »

11/5/2021Emily PackardNC State NewsFred Gould has been named executive director of the Genetics and Genomics Academy, effective November 1. Gould is a William Neal Reynolds Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.Fred Gould

NC State Launches Universitywide Genetics and Genomics Academy

Emily Packard, NC State News | 11/5/2021

Fred Gould has been named executive director of the Genetics and Genomics Academy, effective November 1. Gould is a William Neal Reynolds Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. • Read more »

10/25/2021Richard CampbellNC State CALS NewsThe program has already impacted 2021-2024 Rockey FFAR Fellows Cohort member DeShae Dillard, an NC State Ph.D. student in entomology. “I was recently accepted into the Leadership Development Committee for ESA. Being a fellow has radically changed my perspective on what I am able to accomplish as an individual.”DeShae Dillard

Graduate Mentorship Program Extended for Future Cohorts

Richard Campbell, NC State CALS News | 10/25/2021

The program has already impacted 2021-2024 Rockey FFAR Fellows Cohort member DeShae Dillard, an NC State Ph.D. student in entomology. “I was recently accepted into the Leadership Development Committee for ESA. Being a fellow has radically changed my perspective on what I am able to accomplish as an individual.” • Read more »

10/8/2021PJ BogdanNC State CALS News“There’s a growing recognition that we need to innovate better – and in a way that takes into account societal perceptions and needs,” Grieger said.Khara Grieger

Khara Grieger to Co-lead Knowledge Transfer Efforts for New $25 million Phosphorus Research Center

PJ Bogdan, NC State CALS News | 10/8/2021

“There’s a growing recognition that we need to innovate better – and in a way that takes into account societal perceptions and needs,” Grieger said. • Read more »

10/5/2021Shobita ParthasarathyThe Received Wisdom PodcastIn this episode, STS scholars Shobita Parthasarathy and Jack Stilgoe chat with Jason Delborne (beginning at 17:20), a professor at NC State University who has done both research and public and policy engagement related to gene drives, a new form of biotechnology that could transform our ecosystems. Jason Delborne

Episode 20: Risk, Expertise, and the Power of Community Perspectives in Science and Technology ft. Jason Delborne

Shobita Parthasarathy, The Received Wisdom Podcast | 10/5/2021

In this episode, STS scholars Shobita Parthasarathy and Jack Stilgoe chat with Jason Delborne (beginning at 17:20), a professor at NC State University who has done both research and public and policy engagement related to gene drives, a new form of biotechnology that could transform our ecosystems. • Read more »

10/5/2021iGEM#SynBio PodcastIn today's episode we discuss with Todd Kuiken of the NC State GES Center: bringing the iGEM SDG (sustainable development goals) working group to life; the first few questions iGEMers should ask themselves when trying to develop an SDG project; and the intense, controversial and hopeful conversations taking place at the UN and within the convention of biological diversity.Todd Kuiken

iGEM. Tackles. SDGs. Todd Kuiken chat with Zeeshan.

iGEM, #SynBio Podcast | 10/5/2021

In today's episode we discuss with Todd Kuiken of the NC State GES Center: bringing the iGEM SDG (sustainable development goals) working group to life; the first few questions iGEMers should ask themselves when trying to develop an SDG project; and the intense, controversial and hopeful conversations taking place at the UN and within the convention of biological diversity. • Read more »

9/29/2021Nash DunnAccoladesWe asked Jennifer Kuzma to share some of her insights with our readers. Here, she answers five essential questions about these increasingly prevalent technologies and products. Jennifer Kuzma

What to Know About GMOs: Five Questions with Biotech Policy Expert Jennifer Kuzma

Nash Dunn, Accolades | 9/29/2021

We asked Jennifer Kuzma to share some of her insights with our readers. Here, she answers five essential questions about these increasingly prevalent technologies and products. • Read more »

8/2/2021PodcastBBC Business DailyProfessor Fred Gould, who chaired a large study into safety of GMOs for the National Academy of Sciences in the US, warns that this technology is not a silver bullet for solving all of our environmental and health problems.Fred Gould

Podcast: GMOs - from 'Frankenfoods' to Superfoods?

Podcast, BBC Business Daily | 8/2/2021

Professor Fred Gould, who chaired a large study into safety of GMOs for the National Academy of Sciences in the US, warns that this technology is not a silver bullet for solving all of our environmental and health problems. • Read more »

7/30/2021Lisa AbendSalonIn the U.S., Kuzma has noted similar trends. "In surveys, people say they see edits or genes inserted from the same species as slightly more acceptable than transgenic," she said, referring to genes inserted from different species.Jennifer Kuzma

A Sterile Solution: How Crispr Could Protect Wild Salmon

Lisa Abend, Salon | 7/30/2021

In the U.S., Kuzma has noted similar trends. "In surveys, people say they see edits or genes inserted from the same species as slightly more acceptable than transgenic," she said, referring to genes inserted from different species. • Read more »

7/28/2021BBC World ServiceGenetic Literacy ProjectBy putting their faith in technology, have scientists and companies overlooked other simpler solutions to our food security problems?Jennifer Kuzma

Podcast: By focusing on biotechnology breakthroughs, have scientists overlooked simpler solutions to our food security problems?

BBC World Service, Genetic Literacy Project | 7/28/2021

By putting their faith in technology, have scientists and companies overlooked other simpler solutions to our food security problems? • Read more »

7/26/2021Paul BaskenTimes Higher EducationBut that’s not unwarranted given the complexities and potential implications of genetic changes that could become permanent and spread across the food supply, said Professor Kuzma, a co-founder and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NC State. Research delays attributed to the FDA may be upsetting some universities but could benefit them in the long run if it prevents a dangerous mistake, Professor Kuzma said.Jennifer Kuzma

US universities push for fewer hurdles on gene editing farm animals

Paul Basken, Times Higher Education | 7/26/2021

But that’s not unwarranted given the complexities and potential implications of genetic changes that could become permanent and spread across the food supply, said Professor Kuzma, a co-founder and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NC State. Research delays attributed to the FDA may be upsetting some universities but could benefit them in the long run if it prevents a dangerous mistake, Professor Kuzma said. • Read more »

7/21/2021Lisa AbendUndark Magazine“The producers thought that only their edit was being introduced,” said Jennifer Kuzma, a professor and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. “You have to be cautious that you’re not getting any off-target” — or unintended — “effects,” she said. One way to guard against this: Sequence the offspring’s entire genome and look carefully for unintended changes in the DNA.Jennifer Kuzma

A Sterile Solution: How Crispr Could Protect Wild Salmon

Lisa Abend, Undark Magazine | 7/21/2021

“The producers thought that only their edit was being introduced,” said Jennifer Kuzma, a professor and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. “You have to be cautious that you’re not getting any off-target” — or unintended — “effects,” she said. One way to guard against this: Sequence the offspring’s entire genome and look carefully for unintended changes in the DNA. • Read more »

7/20/2021Jennifer KahnNew York Times MagazineNearly half of all U.S. shoppers say that they try not to buy G.M.O. foods, while a study by Jennifer Kuzma, a biochemist who is a director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, found that consumers will pay up to 20 percent more to avoid them.The fear of such unforeseen effects — what Kuzma calls “unknowingness” — is perhaps consumers’ biggest concern when it comes to G.M.O.s. Genetic interactions, after all, are famously complex. Adding a new gene — or simply changing how a gene is regulated (i.e., how active it is) — rarely affects just a single thing.Jennifer Kuzma, Fred Gould

Learning to Love G.M.O.s

Jennifer Kahn, New York Times Magazine | 7/20/2021

Nearly half of all U.S. shoppers say that they try not to buy G.M.O. foods, while a study by Jennifer Kuzma, a biochemist who is a director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, found that consumers will pay up to 20 percent more to avoid them.The fear of such unforeseen effects — what Kuzma calls “unknowingness” — is perhaps consumers’ biggest concern when it comes to G.M.O.s. Genetic interactions, after all, are famously complex. Adding a new gene — or simply changing how a gene is regulated (i.e., how active it is) — rarely affects just a single thing. • Read more »

7/20/2021Jennifer KahnNew York Times MagazineDespite that, plant geneticists tend not to be overly concerned about the risks of G.M.O.s, as long as the modifications are made with some care. As a 2016 report by the National Academy of Sciences found, G.M.O.s were generally safe, though it allowed that minor impacts were theoretically possible. Fred Gould, a professor of agriculture who was chairman of the committee that prepared the 600-page report, noted that genetic changes that alter a metabolic pathway — the cellular process that transforms biochemical elements into a particular nutrient or compound, like the anthocyanins in Martin’s tomato — were especially important to study because they could cause cascading effects.Jennifer Kuzma, Fred Gould

Learning to Love G.M.O.s

Jennifer Kahn, New York Times Magazine | 7/20/2021

Despite that, plant geneticists tend not to be overly concerned about the risks of G.M.O.s, as long as the modifications are made with some care. As a 2016 report by the National Academy of Sciences found, G.M.O.s were generally safe, though it allowed that minor impacts were theoretically possible. Fred Gould, a professor of agriculture who was chairman of the committee that prepared the 600-page report, noted that genetic changes that alter a metabolic pathway — the cellular process that transforms biochemical elements into a particular nutrient or compound, like the anthocyanins in Martin’s tomato — were especially important to study because they could cause cascading effects. • Read more »

6/7/2021Marlin E. RiceAmerican EntomologistResearch scientist Fred Gould began his career studying the evolution of spider mite host range and its relationship to the development of insecticide resistance.Fred Gould

Fred Gould: Indeed, I Was a Hippie

Marlin E. Rice, American Entomologist | 6/7/2021

Research scientist Fred Gould began his career studying the evolution of spider mite host range and its relationship to the development of insecticide resistance. • Read more »

4/12/2021Taylor WhiteUndarkWhile the company does not plan to release the mosquitos near areas where the antibiotic is used, Kuzma says the EPA’s risk assessment did not include testing of any standing water for tetracycline — something, she adds, “would have been easy enough to do for good due diligence.”Jennifer Kuzma

First GMO Mosquitoes to Be Released In the Florida Keys

Taylor White, Undark | 4/12/2021

While the company does not plan to release the mosquitos near areas where the antibiotic is used, Kuzma says the EPA’s risk assessment did not include testing of any standing water for tetracycline — something, she adds, “would have been easy enough to do for good due diligence.” • Read more »

4/6/2021Jheni OsmanBBC SoundsA conversation with scientists [including Dr. Todd Kuiken] currently researching potential uses of gene editing for environmental conservation, including combining it with a gene drive to control grey squirrel populations, using CRISPR to find the genes responsible for heat tolerance in coral, and editing genetic diversity into species on the brink of extinction.Todd Kuiken

Podcast: Gene editing could revolutionise environmental conservation – but should we use it?

Jheni Osman, BBC Sounds | 4/6/2021

A conversation with scientists [including Dr. Todd Kuiken] currently researching potential uses of gene editing for environmental conservation, including combining it with a gene drive to control grey squirrel populations, using CRISPR to find the genes responsible for heat tolerance in coral, and editing genetic diversity into species on the brink of extinction. • Read more »

3/30/2021Joseph Opoku GakpoModern GhanaNassib Mugwanya, a Ugandan agricultural communications specialist [and AgBioFEWS Fellow] who previously worked with the National Crops Resources Research Institute, believes the wholistic definition of agroecology creates an opportunity to embrace emerging technologies, such as genetically modified (GM) seeds. Nassib Mugwanya

Agroecology movement is not against modern technologies - Peasant Farmers Association of Ghana

Joseph Opoku Gakpo, Modern Ghana | 3/30/2021

Nassib Mugwanya, a Ugandan agricultural communications specialist [and AgBioFEWS Fellow] who previously worked with the National Crops Resources Research Institute, believes the wholistic definition of agroecology creates an opportunity to embrace emerging technologies, such as genetically modified (GM) seeds. • Read more »

3/26/2021Jim McCarthyKeys Weekly“In the laboratory, it turned out the male mosquitoes flew fine and mated well. But in the real environment, they weren’t as strong as the wild type mosquitoes..." said Fred Gould. Jennifer Kuzma, professor of public and international affairs at NC State, outlined a lack of higher level oversight involving not only federal agencies, but also interested parties and external expert advisory panels.Jennifer Kuzma, Fred Gould

Village Hears From Experts As Genetic-Mosquito Release Experiment Nears

Jim McCarthy, Keys Weekly | 3/26/2021

“In the laboratory, it turned out the male mosquitoes flew fine and mated well. But in the real environment, they weren’t as strong as the wild type mosquitoes..." said Fred Gould. Jennifer Kuzma, professor of public and international affairs at NC State, outlined a lack of higher level oversight involving not only federal agencies, but also interested parties and external expert advisory panels. • Read more »

3/23/2021Gene Drive NetworkIn this video produced by the Gene Drive Network, Dr. Jason Delborne discusses how local communities can participate in gene drive research, and describes an analogy of "grasping hands," where each participant allows themselves the possibility of being moved.Jason Delborne

Video: How do local communities participate in gene drive research?

, Gene Drive Network | 3/23/2021

In this video produced by the Gene Drive Network, Dr. Jason Delborne discusses how local communities can participate in gene drive research, and describes an analogy of "grasping hands," where each participant allows themselves the possibility of being moved. • Read more »

3/15/2021Emily JourneyGMO WatchDr. Fred Gould shares the importance of GMOs being much more than just how we can alter the food we eat and what scientists are doing now to change the future of potential disease and overall health. Fred Gould

Podcast: GMOs and Sustainable Crops

Emily Journey, GMO Watch | 3/15/2021

Dr. Fred Gould shares the importance of GMOs being much more than just how we can alter the food we eat and what scientists are doing now to change the future of potential disease and overall health. • Read more »

3/2/2021Margaret EvansGenetic Literacy Project“There is a segment of the population where people want to know whether their foods are modified by modern biotechnology and they won’t necessarily distinguish between something that is transgenetic, a first-generation genetic engineered method or a second-generation gene edited technique. I think it’s important for people to know that these gene edited plants are going into the market.”Jennifer Kuzma

Viewpoint: Gene-edited crop developers need to win public trust. Transparency is how they can do it

Margaret Evans, Genetic Literacy Project | 3/2/2021

“There is a segment of the population where people want to know whether their foods are modified by modern biotechnology and they won’t necessarily distinguish between something that is transgenetic, a first-generation genetic engineered method or a second-generation gene edited technique. I think it’s important for people to know that these gene edited plants are going into the market.” • Read more »

3/1/2021Pamela SmithDTN Progressive Farmer"Consumers want to know which products are genetically modified and which are not. I don't expect that to change for gene-edited crops," Kuzma said. "Crop developers, including companies, have signaled they want to do a better job with gene editing to improve public trust.Jennifer Kuzma, Khara Grieger

Gene Revolution Turns 25 - 1

Pamela Smith, DTN Progressive Farmer | 3/1/2021

"Consumers want to know which products are genetically modified and which are not. I don't expect that to change for gene-edited crops," Kuzma said. "Crop developers, including companies, have signaled they want to do a better job with gene editing to improve public trust. • Read more »

3/1/2021PostGM WatchThe article reports Kuzma as saying that "even though developers of biotech foods want to do better with a second generation of gene editing, they are really making things more complicated by obscuring the terminology and exempting many things from both regulation and labelling."Jennifer Kuzma, Khara Grieger

Researchers want GMO transparency

Post, GM Watch | 3/1/2021

The article reports Kuzma as saying that "even though developers of biotech foods want to do better with a second generation of gene editing, they are really making things more complicated by obscuring the terminology and exempting many things from both regulation and labelling." • Read more »

2/25/2021Margaret EvansThe Western Producer“Because many gene-edited crops would be exempt under SECURE, and new GM food-labelling rules may not apply to them, there needs to be some information repository for companies that want to do the right thing and be more transparent,” said Kuzma. “Our recommendations would provide a mechanism for that.”Jennifer Kuzma

Researchers want GMO transparency

Margaret Evans, The Western Producer | 2/25/2021

“Because many gene-edited crops would be exempt under SECURE, and new GM food-labelling rules may not apply to them, there needs to be some information repository for companies that want to do the right thing and be more transparent,” said Kuzma. “Our recommendations would provide a mechanism for that.” • Read more »

2/9/2021Jennifer HowardMorning Ag ClipsResearcher and associate professor Ramon Leon's interdisciplinary 3-D Weed Vision System aims to equip farmers with DIY imaging technology to reliably anticipate their cover crop’s performance and address weed escapes with precision accuracyRamon Leon

Alternative weed control - we'll have an app for that

Jennifer Howard, Morning Ag Clips | 2/9/2021

Researcher and associate professor Ramon Leon's interdisciplinary 3-D Weed Vision System aims to equip farmers with DIY imaging technology to reliably anticipate their cover crop’s performance and address weed escapes with precision accuracy • Read more »

1/27/2021Emily MullinFuture Human“The developers of genetically engineered animals are thinking that they’re going to have an easier time going through the regulatory process,” says Jennifer Kuzma, PhD, co-founder and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, of the proposed change.Jennifer Kuzma

Gene-Edited Bacon Could Be Coming to Your Plate Soon

Emily Mullin, Future Human | 1/27/2021

“The developers of genetically engineered animals are thinking that they’re going to have an easier time going through the regulatory process,” says Jennifer Kuzma, PhD, co-founder and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, of the proposed change. • Read more »

1/20/2021Todd KuikenBiodesignedEnvironmental scientist Todd Kuiken weighs the pros and cons of deploying biotechnology to protect vulnerable ecosystems.Todd Kuiken

Biotech: An Environmentalist’s Dilemma

Todd Kuiken, Biodesigned | 1/20/2021

Environmental scientist Todd Kuiken weighs the pros and cons of deploying biotechnology to protect vulnerable ecosystems. • Read more »

1/13/2021Foundation for the National Institutes of HealthVideo: Dr. Fred Gould and Sir Charles Godfray (Oxford University) discuss the interesting exploration of gene drive technologies in agriculture, biodiversity, and human diseaseFred Gould

Exploring Gene Drive Technologies in Agriculture, Biodiversity, and Human Disease

, Foundation for the National Institutes of Health | 1/13/2021

Video: Dr. Fred Gould and Sir Charles Godfray (Oxford University) discuss the interesting exploration of gene drive technologies in agriculture, biodiversity, and human disease • Read more »

1/4/2021Lillianna Byington, Christopher Doering, Megan Poinski Food DiveConsumers will see food with a lot of different traits, such as fresher and tastier, "although they will not necessarily know they are gene edited,” said Jennifer Kuzma, a professor at North Carolina State University and co-director of its Genetic Engineering and Society Center.Jennifer Kuzma

5 trends fueling food and beverage innovation in 2021

Lillianna Byington, Christopher Doering, Megan Poinski , Food Dive | 1/4/2021

Consumers will see food with a lot of different traits, such as fresher and tastier, "although they will not necessarily know they are gene edited,” said Jennifer Kuzma, a professor at North Carolina State University and co-director of its Genetic Engineering and Society Center. • Read more »

12/27/2020Sebastián ZárateSociety for Social Studies of ScienceSebastián Zárate (AgBioFEWS Fellow) describes the participation of Francisco Sagasti on the Annual Meeting of CTS in Perú in 2018 and reflects on the challenging role of Sagasti as a National President. Sebastián Zárate

Francisco Sagasti, the intellectual who fosters science and democracy in Peru’s most critical hour

Sebastián Zárate, Society for Social Studies of Science | 12/27/2020

Sebastián Zárate (AgBioFEWS Fellow) describes the participation of Francisco Sagasti on the Annual Meeting of CTS in Perú in 2018 and reflects on the challenging role of Sagasti as a National President. • Read more »

12/17/2020Mario AguileraUC San Diego Press“Core commitments for field trials of gene drive organisms,” published Dec. 18, 2020 in Science by more than 40 researchers, including GES Center Co-Directors Jennifer Kuzma and Fred Gould and GES Executive Committee member Jason Delborne, as well as several other GES-affiliated faculty and scholars.Jason Delborne, Fred Gould, Jennifer Kuzma, Royden Saah, Max Scott, Marce Lorenzen

Scientists Set a Path for Field Trials of Gene Drive Organisms

Mario Aguilera, UC San Diego Press | 12/17/2020

“Core commitments for field trials of gene drive organisms,” published Dec. 18, 2020 in Science by more than 40 researchers, including GES Center Co-Directors Jennifer Kuzma and Fred Gould and GES Executive Committee member Jason Delborne, as well as several other GES-affiliated faculty and scholars. • Read more »

12/14/2020NC State NewsPatti Mulligan, GES Center Communications Director, was awarded the NC State Chancellor’s Award for Excellence for Efficiency and Innovation, the university’s most prestigious honor bestowed upon non-faculty employees. Patti Mulligan

Awards for Excellence 2020 Recognition Ceremony

, NC State News | 12/14/2020

Patti Mulligan, GES Center Communications Director, was awarded the NC State Chancellor’s Award for Excellence for Efficiency and Innovation, the university’s most prestigious honor bestowed upon non-faculty employees. • Read more »

12/4/2020Joseph Opoku GakpoJoy OnlineUgandan agriculturalist Nassib Mugwanya has argued the limitations of agroecology will make it difficult to scale it up across Africa. “Whatever the problems and limitations of modern agriculture may be, dogmatic adherence to a model based fundamentally on traditional farming is not the answer. African agriculture needs transformation,” he observes.Nassib Mugwanya

Dependence on agroecology will jeopardise our food security – Deputy Agric Minister

Joseph Opoku Gakpo, Joy Online | 12/4/2020

Ugandan agriculturalist Nassib Mugwanya has argued the limitations of agroecology will make it difficult to scale it up across Africa. “Whatever the problems and limitations of modern agriculture may be, dogmatic adherence to a model based fundamentally on traditional farming is not the answer. African agriculture needs transformation,” he observes. • Read more »

11/19/2020Mick KulikowskiNC State NewsNC State researchers Jennifer Kuzma and Khara Grieger, in a policy forum paper published in the journal Science, say that SECURE, though decades in the making, falls short in providing enough public information about gene-edited crops in the food supply. Jennifer Kuzma, Khara Grieger

More Transparency Recommended for Gene-Edited Crops

Mick Kulikowski, NC State News | 11/19/2020

NC State researchers Jennifer Kuzma and Khara Grieger, in a policy forum paper published in the journal Science, say that SECURE, though decades in the making, falls short in providing enough public information about gene-edited crops in the food supply. • Read more »

11/11/2020Margaret HuffmanNC State ARE News"While these results suggest that some farmers may be free-riding on their neighbors’ use of Bt crops, this should not be taken to conclude that farmers are necessarily ‘underadopting’ Bt crops,” said Zack Brown, Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics and GES Center faculty member.Zack Brown

The ‘Public Good’ of Controlling Mobile Pests with Genetically Engineered Crops

Margaret Huffman, NC State ARE News | 11/11/2020

"While these results suggest that some farmers may be free-riding on their neighbors’ use of Bt crops, this should not be taken to conclude that farmers are necessarily ‘underadopting’ Bt crops,” said Zack Brown, Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics and GES Center faculty member. • Read more »

11/2/2020Stacy ChandlerNC State CALS MagazineAgBioFEWS Fellow Jabeen Ahmad's journey from public defender to plant biologist. “Interdisciplinary studies are crucial now. It is absolutely essential to have a skill set that can cross into all of these different spheres."Jabeen Ahmad

Sunrise to Startups, Grad Students Plan Futures

Stacy Chandler, NC State CALS Magazine | 11/2/2020

AgBioFEWS Fellow Jabeen Ahmad's journey from public defender to plant biologist. “Interdisciplinary studies are crucial now. It is absolutely essential to have a skill set that can cross into all of these different spheres." • Read more »

9/10/2020Technology NetworksDr. Baltzegar teaches us about how the maturation of genetic engineering approaches has advanced gene drives, the two different strategies for gene drives and some of the key questions surrounding the application of gene drives in society.Jennifer Baltzegar

Video: Teach Me in 10 – Gene Drive Research With Dr Jennifer Baltzegar

, Technology Networks | 9/10/2020

Dr. Baltzegar teaches us about how the maturation of genetic engineering approaches has advanced gene drives, the two different strategies for gene drives and some of the key questions surrounding the application of gene drives in society. • Read more »

9/2/2020The Measure of Everyday Life podcastNew advances in nanotechnology offer potential promise for the future as well as raising concerns for some. On this episode, we talk with Khara Grieger of North Carolina State University about her work on public understanding of nanotechnology innovations for food production.Khara Grieger

Podcast: The Unseen World of Food Nanotechnology

, The Measure of Everyday Life podcast | 9/2/2020

New advances in nanotechnology offer potential promise for the future as well as raising concerns for some. On this episode, we talk with Khara Grieger of North Carolina State University about her work on public understanding of nanotechnology innovations for food production. • Read more »

8/10/2020Matt SimpsonNC State ORI NewsSHRA Winner - Patti Mulligan, director of communications for the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, was nominated in the Efficiency and Innovation category.Patti Mulligan

Office of Research and Innovation Honors Three with Award for Excellence

Matt Simpson, NC State ORI News | 8/10/2020

SHRA Winner - Patti Mulligan, director of communications for the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, was nominated in the Efficiency and Innovation category. • Read more »

8/5/2020Dyllan FurnessUndarkWhile the presence of antibiotic-resistant plasmid genes in beef probably does not pose a direct threat to consumers, according to Jennifer Kuzma, a professor of science and technology policy and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, it does raise the possible risk of introducing antibiotic-resistant genes into the microflora of people’s digestive systems. Jennifer Kuzma

Biotechnology Could Change the Cattle Industry. Will it Succeed?

Dyllan Furness, Undark | 8/5/2020

While the presence of antibiotic-resistant plasmid genes in beef probably does not pose a direct threat to consumers, according to Jennifer Kuzma, a professor of science and technology policy and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, it does raise the possible risk of introducing antibiotic-resistant genes into the microflora of people’s digestive systems. • Read more »

7/21/2020Rosemary BrandtNC State ARE NewsNicknamed the "billion-dollar beetle" for its enormous economic costs to growers in the United States each year, the western corn rootworm is one of the most devastating pests farmers face. Zack Brown

Returning to Farming’s Roots in the Battle Against the ‘Billion-Dollar Beetle’

Rosemary Brandt, NC State ARE News | 7/21/2020

Nicknamed the "billion-dollar beetle" for its enormous economic costs to growers in the United States each year, the western corn rootworm is one of the most devastating pests farmers face. • Read more »

6/29/2020Mollie RappeNC State CALS NewsJason Delborne, a researcher with the Genetic Engineering and Society Center and the College of Natural Resources, will lead the efforts to assess public opinion and analyze the potential regulatory pathway for techniques to introduce beneficial plant fungi to crops.Jason Delborne

Using Leaf Fungi to Improve Crop Resilience

Mollie Rappe, NC State CALS News | 6/29/2020

Jason Delborne, a researcher with the Genetic Engineering and Society Center and the College of Natural Resources, will lead the efforts to assess public opinion and analyze the potential regulatory pathway for techniques to introduce beneficial plant fungi to crops. • Read more »

6/27/2020Jenny McGrathDigital TrendsDr. Jennifer Kuzma, Ph.D., co-founder and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society (GES) Center at North Carolina State University, co-authored two articles raising concerns, one in The Conversation and one in The Boston Globe. “It was just surprising to me and my coauthors that, in the face of such an important decision to release the first genetically modified mosquito into the wild, that there wasn’t an external scientific board or panel that could help EPA make that decision."Jennifer Kuzma

Gene-edited mosquitoes are ready for the U.S. — but is the U.S. ready for them?

Jenny McGrath, Digital Trends | 6/27/2020

Dr. Jennifer Kuzma, Ph.D., co-founder and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society (GES) Center at North Carolina State University, co-authored two articles raising concerns, one in The Conversation and one in The Boston Globe. “It was just surprising to me and my coauthors that, in the face of such an important decision to release the first genetically modified mosquito into the wild, that there wasn’t an external scientific board or panel that could help EPA make that decision." • Read more »

6/22/2020Natalie Kofler and Jennifer KuzmaIf risks are being assessed, it is largely happening behind closed doors between technology developers and EPA employees.Jennifer Kuzma

Before genetically modified mosquitoes are released, we need a better EPA

Natalie Kofler and Jennifer Kuzma, | 6/22/2020

If risks are being assessed, it is largely happening behind closed doors between technology developers and EPA employees. • Read more »

6/11/2020Judith RetanaCBS-17Professor Jennifer Kuzma, a professor in the School of Public and International Affairs and Co-director of Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NCSU said we should take this study with a grain of salt.Jennifer Kuzma

Study uses satellite imagery, internet searches to track COVID-19, how reliable is it?

Judith Retana, CBS-17 | 6/11/2020

Professor Jennifer Kuzma, a professor in the School of Public and International Affairs and Co-director of Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NCSU said we should take this study with a grain of salt. • Read more »

6/9/2020InfoBustlerBDC 2020 JUDGES: Fred Gould, Co-director, Genetic Engineering and Society Center, NC State; Todd Kuiken, Senior Research Scholar, North Carolina State UniversityTodd Kuiken, Fred Gould

Biodesign Challenge Summit 2020

Info, Bustler | 6/9/2020

BDC 2020 JUDGES: Fred Gould, Co-director, Genetic Engineering and Society Center, NC State; Todd Kuiken, Senior Research Scholar, North Carolina State University • Read more »

6/4/2020Brian Allan et alThe ConversationAs vector biologists, geneticists, policy experts and bioethicists, we are concerned that current government oversight and scientific evaluation of GM mosquitoes do not ensure their responsible deployment.Jennifer Kuzma

Genetically modified mosquitoes could be released in Florida and Texas beginning this summer – silver bullet or jumping the gun?

Brian Allan et al, The Conversation | 6/4/2020

As vector biologists, geneticists, policy experts and bioethicists, we are concerned that current government oversight and scientific evaluation of GM mosquitoes do not ensure their responsible deployment. • Read more »

5/18/2020Margaret TalbotThe New YorkerTodd Kuiken, a researcher at N.C. State who has studied the D.I.Y.-bio community for years, told me, “At first, there was this fear that biohackers in the basement were going to release pandemics. These were really myths.”Todd Kuiken

The Rouge Experimenters

Margaret Talbot, The New Yorker | 5/18/2020

Todd Kuiken, a researcher at N.C. State who has studied the D.I.Y.-bio community for years, told me, “At first, there was this fear that biohackers in the basement were going to release pandemics. These were really myths.” • Read more »

2/21/2020Rebecca L. Moritz, Kavita M. Berger, Barbara R. Owen, David R. GillumScienceReference to Todd Kuiken's work: "For example, the implementation of the credential could be modeled after work being done within the DIYbio community, which involves obtaining widespread adoption of safety practices among distributed communities from around the world (10). This is an example of what can be achieved through engagement, communication, and partnership."Todd Kuiken

Policy Forum: Promoting biosecurity by professionalizing biosecurity

Rebecca L. Moritz, Kavita M. Berger, Barbara R. Owen, David R. Gillum, Science | 2/21/2020

Reference to Todd Kuiken's work: "For example, the implementation of the credential could be modeled after work being done within the DIYbio community, which involves obtaining widespread adoption of safety practices among distributed communities from around the world (10). This is an example of what can be achieved through engagement, communication, and partnership." • Read more »

2/20/2020Blaine FriedlanderCornell NewsNassib Mugwanya, center, a member of the Cornell Alliance for Science’s inaugural cohort (and GES AgBioFEWS Fellow), talks with Ed Buckler, right, a U.S. Department of Agriculture appointee and a Cornell adjunct professor on plant breeding and genetics, after a AAAS agricultural session on Feb. 15.Nassib Mugwanya

Cornell scientists amplify ‘green’ research at AAAS

Blaine Friedlander, Cornell News | 2/20/2020

Nassib Mugwanya, center, a member of the Cornell Alliance for Science’s inaugural cohort (and GES AgBioFEWS Fellow), talks with Ed Buckler, right, a U.S. Department of Agriculture appointee and a Cornell adjunct professor on plant breeding and genetics, after a AAAS agricultural session on Feb. 15. • Read more »

2/17/2020StaffNC State CALS NewsFour NC State research teams have been selected as recipients of the next phase of the Game-Changing Research Incentive Program (GRIP). The program was initially created in 2016 as a three-year seed-funding initiative to stimulate interdisciplinary and collaborative research. Now, a new initiative — called GRIP4PSI — will encourage the NC State community to collaborate on integrated researchKhara Grieger, Jennifer Kuzma

GRIP4PSI Seed Grant Winners Announced

Staff, NC State CALS News | 2/17/2020

Four NC State research teams have been selected as recipients of the next phase of the Game-Changing Research Incentive Program (GRIP). The program was initially created in 2016 as a three-year seed-funding initiative to stimulate interdisciplinary and collaborative research. Now, a new initiative — called GRIP4PSI — will encourage the NC State community to collaborate on integrated research • Read more »

1/24/2020Liz TraceyJSTOR DailyResources: ENGINEERING THE WILD: GENE DRIVES AND INTERGENERATIONAL EQUITY, By: Jennifer Kuzma and Lindsey RawlsJennifer Kuzma

Can CRISPR Save Tufty Fluffytail?

Liz Tracey, JSTOR Daily | 1/24/2020

Resources: ENGINEERING THE WILD: GENE DRIVES AND INTERGENERATIONAL EQUITY, By: Jennifer Kuzma and Lindsey Rawls • Read more »

1/13/2020Brian HoweIndy Week“There are different ways of knowing things,” Gould adds. “That’s why Molly came up with the name: not artwork, but art’s work. What is an artist supposed to do?"Fred Gould

At the Crossroads of Art and Biotech, a Warning: Be Careful What You Wish For

Brian Howe, Indy Week | 1/13/2020

“There are different ways of knowing things,” Gould adds. “That’s why Molly came up with the name: not artwork, but art’s work. What is an artist supposed to do?" • Read more »

1/12/2020Ira BasenCBC RadioKuzma agrees that GMO researchers have sometimes been guilty of "perhaps overstating the promise of the technology and understating potential risk." But she believes those involved in developing gene-editing techniques want to avoid repeating the mistakes of the past.Jennifer Kuzma

Gene editing could revolutionize the food industry, but it'll have to fight the PR war GMO foods lost

Ira Basen, CBC Radio | 1/12/2020

Kuzma agrees that GMO researchers have sometimes been guilty of "perhaps overstating the promise of the technology and understating potential risk." But she believes those involved in developing gene-editing techniques want to avoid repeating the mistakes of the past. • Read more »

1/10/2020Grant Holub-Moorman & Anita RaoWUNC The State of Things program""I'm interested in how we can use art and science to break down some of these symbols to actually break down that hierarchy." - Charlotte Jarvis, Art's Work/Genetic Futures artistTodd Kuiken, Fred Gould, Patti Mulligan

An Ancient Greek Festival For Creating Female Sperm

Grant Holub-Moorman & Anita Rao, WUNC The State of Things program | 1/10/2020

""I'm interested in how we can use art and science to break down some of these symbols to actually break down that hierarchy." - Charlotte Jarvis, Art's Work/Genetic Futures artist • Read more »

1/8/2020Jennifer KahnThe New York Times MagazineTodd Kuiken, a researcher at the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, says that “it was basically a lesson in how not to do things.” But, he pointed out, the “Monsanto Mistake” also alerted researchers to the need for a more transparent and collaborative approach. Todd Kuiken

Feature: The Gene Drive Dilemma: We Can Alter Entire Species, but Should We?

Jennifer Kahn, The New York Times Magazine | 1/8/2020

Todd Kuiken, a researcher at the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, says that “it was basically a lesson in how not to do things.” But, he pointed out, the “Monsanto Mistake” also alerted researchers to the need for a more transparent and collaborative approach. • Read more »

1/7/2020Alice FleerackersArt the ScienceNC State University is the perfect place to discuss these issues, as the institution has been at the forefront of not only discoveries and innovations in genetics, but is also the home of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center (GES). The Center’s co-director entomologist Fred Gould, along with Molly Renda with NCSU Libraries’ Exhibit Program had discussed creating an art exhibit that addressed the same ethical and practical questions being discussed among GES’s interdisciplinary scholars..."Todd Kuiken, Fred Gould, Patti Mulligan

Works - Art's Work in the Age of Biotechnology

Alice Fleerackers, Art the Science | 1/7/2020

NC State University is the perfect place to discuss these issues, as the institution has been at the forefront of not only discoveries and innovations in genetics, but is also the home of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center (GES). The Center’s co-director entomologist Fred Gould, along with Molly Renda with NCSU Libraries’ Exhibit Program had discussed creating an art exhibit that addressed the same ethical and practical questions being discussed among GES’s interdisciplinary scholars..." • Read more »

1/2/2020StaffNC State NewsThe Agricultural Biotechnology in Food, Energy and Water Systems program brings scholars together to solve grand challenges.Fred Gould, Jennifer Kuzma

Fusing Disciplines, Transforming Graduate Education

Staff, NC State News | 1/2/2020

The Agricultural Biotechnology in Food, Energy and Water Systems program brings scholars together to solve grand challenges. • Read more »

12/19/2019StaffCLOT MagazineArt’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology: Shaping Our Genetic Futures is an art-science exhibit and symposium of artists, scientists, and humanities scholars, led by the North Carolina State University Libraries and the Genetic Engineering and Society (GES) Center, held at the Gregg Museum of Art & Design, the physical and digital display spaces of the University Libraries, and the North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA).Todd Kuiken, Fred Gould, Patti Mulligan

Exhibition: ‘Art’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology: Shaping Our Genetic Futures’

Staff, CLOT Magazine | 12/19/2019

Art’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology: Shaping Our Genetic Futures is an art-science exhibit and symposium of artists, scientists, and humanities scholars, led by the North Carolina State University Libraries and the Genetic Engineering and Society (GES) Center, held at the Gregg Museum of Art & Design, the physical and digital display spaces of the University Libraries, and the North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA). • Read more »

11/22/2019Kelly ServickScience"That trial is the “gold standard,” says [GES Co-director] Fred Gould, an evolutionary biologist at NC State. If the results, expected next year, back up the preliminary evidence that Wolbachia reduces dengue, he says, the World Health Organization could approve this microbial ally for broader use.Fred Gould

Mosquitoes armed with bacteria beat back dengue virus

Kelly Servick, Science | 11/22/2019

"That trial is the “gold standard,” says [GES Co-director] Fred Gould, an evolutionary biologist at NC State. If the results, expected next year, back up the preliminary evidence that Wolbachia reduces dengue, he says, the World Health Organization could approve this microbial ally for broader use. • Read more »

11/18/2019Shayla LoveVICEOne accident could affect the whole future of this work. In 1999, a patient died while participating in a gene therapy trial at the University of Pennsylvania, which "really slowed down...the field for a decade at least," according to Kuzma. "Could it happen in the case of gene drive? Yeah," she said.Jennifer Kuzma

This Gene Technology Could Change the World. Its Maker Isn’t Sure It Should.

Shayla Love, VICE | 11/18/2019

One accident could affect the whole future of this work. In 1999, a patient died while participating in a gene therapy trial at the University of Pennsylvania, which "really slowed down...the field for a decade at least," according to Kuzma. "Could it happen in the case of gene drive? Yeah," she said. • Read more »

11/18/2019Elizabeth BealNC State NewsBringing together literature, science and art to comment on the future of genetic engineering is no small feat. “It feels like the culmination of everything the center has been working towards for the past five years,” says Patti Mulligan, communications director for the GES Center.Patti Mulligan, Jennifer Kuzma, Fred Gould

Margaret Atwood and the Biotechnology of Tomorrow

Elizabeth Beal, NC State News | 11/18/2019

Bringing together literature, science and art to comment on the future of genetic engineering is no small feat. “It feels like the culmination of everything the center has been working towards for the past five years,” says Patti Mulligan, communications director for the GES Center. • Read more »

11/17/2019Rachel DavisTechnicianKuzma said the mission of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center was to guide biotechnologies in responsible and sustainable ways. She stressed the importance of integrating social sciences, natural sciences, engineering and the humanities to tackle these issues and hold each other accountable for possible misuse of the new technologies.Jennifer Kuzma

Margaret Atwood discusses her ‘prophetic’ novel, effects of new science developments on society

Rachel Davis, Technician | 11/17/2019

Kuzma said the mission of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center was to guide biotechnologies in responsible and sustainable ways. She stressed the importance of integrating social sciences, natural sciences, engineering and the humanities to tackle these issues and hold each other accountable for possible misuse of the new technologies. • Read more »

11/6/2019Michael HillThe Associated Press; New York Times"If the chestnut is approved ... I think it's accurate to say that it does help pave the way for other biotech trees," said Jason Delborne, an associate professor of science, policy and society at North Carolina State University. Jason Delborne

High-Tech Chestnuts: US to Consider Genetically Altered Tree

Michael Hill, The Associated Press; New York Times | 11/6/2019

"If the chestnut is approved ... I think it's accurate to say that it does help pave the way for other biotech trees," said Jason Delborne, an associate professor of science, policy and society at North Carolina State University. • Read more »

11/4/2019Laura BrehautNational PostThe technique is perhaps best described by Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. In an interview with Gastropod, she likened DNA to a book and CRISPR to a pen: “You can go in and you can edit the letters in a word, or you can change different phrases, or you can edit whole paragraphs at very specific locations.”Jennifer Kuzma

The world's banana crops are under threat from a deadly fungus. Is gene editing the answer?

Laura Brehaut, National Post | 11/4/2019

The technique is perhaps best described by Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. In an interview with Gastropod, she likened DNA to a book and CRISPR to a pen: “You can go in and you can edit the letters in a word, or you can change different phrases, or you can edit whole paragraphs at very specific locations.” • Read more »

10/22/2019Shelly FanSingularity Hub“Genetic engineering has a pretty rough history when it comes to foods,” said Dr. Jennifer Kuzma at the North Carolina State University to Gastropod, an excellent podcast covering the science and history of food.Jennifer Kuzma

CRISPR Just Created a Hornless Bull, and It’s a Step Forward for Gene-Edited Food

Shelly Fan, Singularity Hub | 10/22/2019

“Genetic engineering has a pretty rough history when it comes to foods,” said Dr. Jennifer Kuzma at the North Carolina State University to Gastropod, an excellent podcast covering the science and history of food. • Read more »

10/14/2019Nicola Twilley, Cynthia Graber, and GastropodThe AtlanticAs Jennifer Kuzma, the co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NC State, explained it to Gastropod, if DNA is a book, CRISPR is like a pen. “You can go in and you can edit the letters in a word, or you can change different phrases, or you can edit whole paragraphs at very specific locations,” she said. “Whereas with first-generation transgenic techniques, it was essentially throwing a new paragraph into a book.”Jennifer Kuzma

The Yogurt Industry Has Been Using CRISPR for a Decade

Nicola Twilley, Cynthia Graber, and Gastropod, The Atlantic | 10/14/2019

As Jennifer Kuzma, the co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NC State, explained it to Gastropod, if DNA is a book, CRISPR is like a pen. “You can go in and you can edit the letters in a word, or you can change different phrases, or you can edit whole paragraphs at very specific locations,” she said. “Whereas with first-generation transgenic techniques, it was essentially throwing a new paragraph into a book.” • Read more »

10/13/2019Dee ShoreNC State CALS MagazineIn CALS entomologist Fred Gould, Dean Richard Linton sees a master craftsman. “Fred is building,” Linton says, “but not with bricks and concrete.”Fred Gould

How Do We Communicate Genetic Engineering?

Dee Shore, NC State CALS Magazine | 10/13/2019

In CALS entomologist Fred Gould, Dean Richard Linton sees a master craftsman. “Fred is building,” Linton says, “but not with bricks and concrete.” • Read more »

10/11/2019Kristen V BrownBloomberg BusinessweekMost DIY gene therapy experiments in people have failed or fizzled out. Todd Kuiken, a researcher at NC State University’s Genetic Engineering & Society Center who studies community science labs, says one measure of success for biohackers would be if they could create alternative pathways for careers in science, as computer hackers have for software engineers.Todd Kuiken

‘Stop Stabbing Yourself,’ a Biohacker Tells His Daredevil Peers

Kristen V Brown, Bloomberg Businessweek | 10/11/2019

Most DIY gene therapy experiments in people have failed or fizzled out. Todd Kuiken, a researcher at NC State University’s Genetic Engineering & Society Center who studies community science labs, says one measure of success for biohackers would be if they could create alternative pathways for careers in science, as computer hackers have for software engineers. • Read more »

10/7/2019GastropodYou've probably heard the hype: CRISPR will revolutionize biotech, cure disease, resurrect extinct species, and even create new-and-(not-so)-improved humans. Dr. Jennifer Kuzma, Co-director of the GES Center at NC State, helps us understand the technology's potential, both good and bad, as well as how it might be regulated and labeledJennifer Kuzma

What’s CRISPR Doing in our Food?

, Gastropod | 10/7/2019

You've probably heard the hype: CRISPR will revolutionize biotech, cure disease, resurrect extinct species, and even create new-and-(not-so)-improved humans. Dr. Jennifer Kuzma, Co-director of the GES Center at NC State, helps us understand the technology's potential, both good and bad, as well as how it might be regulated and labeled • Read more »

9/26/2019Go Ask MomWRAL NewsThis year, the NC Museum of Art waded into the maize maze scene. But, as you might expect, this one isn't as much about getting lost as it is about learning about biotechnology and how it's shaping our genetic futures.Todd Kuiken

Take the Kids: Wander through NC Museum of Art's park to find its corn maze

Go Ask Mom, WRAL News | 9/26/2019

This year, the NC Museum of Art waded into the maize maze scene. But, as you might expect, this one isn't as much about getting lost as it is about learning about biotechnology and how it's shaping our genetic futures. • Read more »

9/25/2019Natalie KoflerEarth Island JournalLast year, 11 of my colleagues — including Kuzma, Esvelt — and I proposed an alternative approach that would provide a neutral space for balanced deliberation on application of CRISPR and gene drive technologies. In an article entitled “Editing nature: Local roots of global governance” published in Science, we lay out a new decision-making model that would enable local community representatives to decide if and how a genetically engineered organism should be released into the environment.Jennifer Kuzma

Tempering Tech with Collective Wisdom

Natalie Kofler, Earth Island Journal | 9/25/2019

Last year, 11 of my colleagues — including Kuzma, Esvelt — and I proposed an alternative approach that would provide a neutral space for balanced deliberation on application of CRISPR and gene drive technologies. In an article entitled “Editing nature: Local roots of global governance” published in Science, we lay out a new decision-making model that would enable local community representatives to decide if and how a genetically engineered organism should be released into the environment. • Read more »

9/22/2019Natash MitchellAustralian Broadcasting Corporation, Radio NationalFrom bioerror to bioterror, Science Friction's Natasha Mitchell was the only journalist at a recent closed NATO biosecurity workshop in Switzerland where leaders in the military, science and citizen science, sociology, and technological governance met to consider the threats.Todd Kuiken

Bioerror to bioterror - does synthetic biology give new tools to terrorists? Part 2

Natash Mitchell, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Radio National | 9/22/2019

From bioerror to bioterror, Science Friction's Natasha Mitchell was the only journalist at a recent closed NATO biosecurity workshop in Switzerland where leaders in the military, science and citizen science, sociology, and technological governance met to consider the threats. • Read more »

9/15/2019Natash MitchellAustralian Broadcasting Corporation, Radio NationalFrom bioerror to bioterror, Science Friction's Natasha Mitchell was the only journalist at a recent closed NATO biosecurity workshop in Switzerland where leaders in the military, science and citizen science, sociology, and technological governance met to consider the threats.Todd Kuiken

From bioerror to bioterror - should we worry about synthetic biology? (Part 1)

Natash Mitchell, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Radio National | 9/15/2019

From bioerror to bioterror, Science Friction's Natasha Mitchell was the only journalist at a recent closed NATO biosecurity workshop in Switzerland where leaders in the military, science and citizen science, sociology, and technological governance met to consider the threats. • Read more »

9/12/2019Mick KulikowskiFuturityPeople were more apt to support gene drive systems that controlled the spread of the drive, says Zack Brown, assistant professor of agricultural and resource economics at North Carolina State University and the corresponding author of a paper describing the research.Zack Brown, Mike Jones

Survey Guages Support for Using Gene Drives to Fight Pests

Mick Kulikowski, Futurity | 9/12/2019

People were more apt to support gene drive systems that controlled the spread of the drive, says Zack Brown, assistant professor of agricultural and resource economics at North Carolina State University and the corresponding author of a paper describing the research. • Read more »

8/13/2019WTVD ABC11RALEIGH (WTVD) — A quarter-acre corn maze is now open at the North Carolina Museum of Art’s Ann and Jim Goodnight Museum Park. The maze called ‘From Teosinte to Tomorrow’ is a conceptual walk through agricultural history.Todd Kuiken, Fred Gould, Patti Mulligan

Corn maze open at North Carolina Museum of Art through October

, WTVD ABC11 | 8/13/2019

RALEIGH (WTVD) — A quarter-acre corn maze is now open at the North Carolina Museum of Art’s Ann and Jim Goodnight Museum Park. The maze called ‘From Teosinte to Tomorrow’ is a conceptual walk through agricultural history. • Read more »

8/8/2019Lauren Bell IssacsCarolina Parent MagazineReady for fall-ish fun? An art-meets-science corn maze exhibit called "From Teosinte to Tomorrow" is opening in partnership with NC State University Libraries and the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at the North Carolina Museum of Art on Sunday, Aug. 11. Todd Kuiken, Fred Gould, Patti Mulligan

Corn Maze to Open at North Carolina Museum of Art

Lauren Bell Issacs, Carolina Parent Magazine | 8/8/2019

Ready for fall-ish fun? An art-meets-science corn maze exhibit called "From Teosinte to Tomorrow" is opening in partnership with NC State University Libraries and the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at the North Carolina Museum of Art on Sunday, Aug. 11. • Read more »

8/2/2019Patti MulliganNC State CHASS NewsResults from the $499,857 grant include obtaining critical information on responsible innovation practices that can help ensure the sustainability of nanomaterials in food and agricultural applications, identifying stakeholder concerns and highlighting key lessons applicable to novel technologies in food and agriculture sectors more broadly.Jennifer Kuzma, Khara Grieger

GES Center Awarded Half-Million Dollar Grant to Study Responsible Innovation of Food Nanotechnology

Patti Mulligan, NC State CHASS News | 8/2/2019

Results from the $499,857 grant include obtaining critical information on responsible innovation practices that can help ensure the sustainability of nanomaterials in food and agricultural applications, identifying stakeholder concerns and highlighting key lessons applicable to novel technologies in food and agriculture sectors more broadly. • Read more »

7/30/2019Steve SuppanInstitute for Agriculture and Trade PolicyUSDA, in its desire to maximize trade in GE crops as soon as possible and everywhere, has proposed a rule that would make it exceedingly difficult to assess a GE plant’s risks, even for the “unfamiliar products” that are targeted for USDA paperwork review, when GE product developers decide not to self-determine their compliance with the rule to increase acceptance of their products by foreign regulators in U.S. export targets . The classification of commercial applicant studies and data as “confidential business information” adds to a proposed rule that, as Professor Kuzma writes, “does not inspire public confidence.”Jennifer Kuzma

USDA to biotech: Call your own compliance

Steve Suppan, Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy | 7/30/2019

USDA, in its desire to maximize trade in GE crops as soon as possible and everywhere, has proposed a rule that would make it exceedingly difficult to assess a GE plant’s risks, even for the “unfamiliar products” that are targeted for USDA paperwork review, when GE product developers decide not to self-determine their compliance with the rule to increase acceptance of their products by foreign regulators in U.S. export targets . The classification of commercial applicant studies and data as “confidential business information” adds to a proposed rule that, as Professor Kuzma writes, “does not inspire public confidence.” • Read more »

7/23/2019Meg WilcoxGreenBizTodd Kuiken, senior research scholar at the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, disagrees. "It’s not as simple as saying, we’ll just produce this from algae now," he said. "There are impacts, there are winners and losers, all of that needs to be evaluated and put on the table so people can make a decision with all of that information in front of them."Todd Kuiken

Just how sustainable is that synbio startup?

Meg Wilcox, GreenBiz | 7/23/2019

Todd Kuiken, senior research scholar at the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, disagrees. "It’s not as simple as saying, we’ll just produce this from algae now," he said. "There are impacts, there are winners and losers, all of that needs to be evaluated and put on the table so people can make a decision with all of that information in front of them." • Read more »

7/23/2019Heidi LedfordNatureEuropean regulators might need to rely on companies to voluntarily share some of that data, says Jennifer Kuzma, a science-policy researcher at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. She suspects that some firms would be willing to do so, to avoid the public scepticism that has plagued genetically modified crops.Jennifer Kuzma

CRISPR conundrum: Strict European court ruling leaves food-testing labs without a plan

Heidi Ledford, Nature | 7/23/2019

European regulators might need to rely on companies to voluntarily share some of that data, says Jennifer Kuzma, a science-policy researcher at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. She suspects that some firms would be willing to do so, to avoid the public scepticism that has plagued genetically modified crops. • Read more »

7/22/2019Associated PressCBS 17“The thing that gets glossed over in the discussions of banning neonics is that the pests themselves aren’t going to go away in these farming systems,” said Burrack, who is also an extension specialist. “Something needs to be done to manage them, and that something might become a more toxic pesticide if this one is removed. That needs to be a part of the conversation.”Hannah Burrack

NC bees are dying. Would a consumer ban on a pesticide help?

Associated Press, CBS 17 | 7/22/2019

“The thing that gets glossed over in the discussions of banning neonics is that the pests themselves aren’t going to go away in these farming systems,” said Burrack, who is also an extension specialist. “Something needs to be done to manage them, and that something might become a more toxic pesticide if this one is removed. That needs to be a part of the conversation.” • Read more »

7/20/2019Tara SantoraScienceLineWhether gene hacking to improve yields will affect plants’ susceptibility to pests is still unknown, says Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. Jennifer Kuzma

Hacking photosynthesis to feed the future

Tara Santora, ScienceLine | 7/20/2019

Whether gene hacking to improve yields will affect plants’ susceptibility to pests is still unknown, says Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. • Read more »

7/8/2019Doug LedermanInside Higher EdToday on the Academic Minute, Jason Delborne, associate professor of science, policy and society at North Carolina State University, explores whether we can have genetically engineered trees like we do foodJason Delborne

Academic Minute: Forest Biotech

Doug Lederman, Inside Higher Ed | 7/8/2019

Today on the Academic Minute, Jason Delborne, associate professor of science, policy and society at North Carolina State University, explores whether we can have genetically engineered trees like we do food • Read more »

6/24/2019CNR NewsNC State“New tools for gene editing and strategies such as synthetic gene drives open up novel opportunities for imagining ways that we might ‘engineer’ biology beyond laboratories and agricultural fields,” said Jason DelborneJason Delborne

Can Genetic Engineering Save Our Planet’s Biodiversity?

CNR News, NC State | 6/24/2019

“New tools for gene editing and strategies such as synthetic gene drives open up novel opportunities for imagining ways that we might ‘engineer’ biology beyond laboratories and agricultural fields,” said Jason Delborne • Read more »

6/24/2019Katie Barnhill-Dilling, Jason DelborneGES CenterThe findings will inform ongoing discussions about the governance of gene drive organisms that may one day be released in the environment. These findings will also contribute to ongoing discussions about early engagement with respect to emerging technologies. Jason Delborne

Workshop Report on Gene Drive Mice for Biodiversity Protection on Islands

Katie Barnhill-Dilling, Jason Delborne, GES Center | 6/24/2019

The findings will inform ongoing discussions about the governance of gene drive organisms that may one day be released in the environment. These findings will also contribute to ongoing discussions about early engagement with respect to emerging technologies. • Read more »

6/18/2019Jennifer KuzmaGES CenterAlthough the EO states that agencies should “base regulatory decisions on scientific and technical evidence,” it ignores its own advice.Jennifer Kuzma

Biotechnology Oversight Gets an Early Make-Over by Trump’s White House and USDA: Part 1—The Executive Order

Jennifer Kuzma, GES Center | 6/18/2019

Although the EO states that agencies should “base regulatory decisions on scientific and technical evidence,” it ignores its own advice. • Read more »

5/30/2019Karen WeintraubThe Guardian[Kuzma] also said that she sees industry making many of the same public relations mistakes with gene editing that they made with GMOs. The industry is fighting labeling and regulation and not being as transparent as it should be about the challenges and shortcomings of gene editing, she said and wrote in a recent article.Jennifer Kuzma

Crispr gene-editing will change the way Americans eat – here's what's coming

Karen Weintraub, The Guardian | 5/30/2019

[Kuzma] also said that she sees industry making many of the same public relations mistakes with gene editing that they made with GMOs. The industry is fighting labeling and regulation and not being as transparent as it should be about the challenges and shortcomings of gene editing, she said and wrote in a recent article. • Read more »

5/28/2019Karl Gruber Embo ReportsHaving access to the technology and knowledge to create something dangerous is still a long way from actually creating it though. “Releasing a virus with the intent to cause harm is illegal,” commented Todd Kuiken, Senior Research Scholar at the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, North Carolina State University. “It's also not that simple. One would need rather sophisticated equipment to engineer, deploy and, importantly, protect themselves from such a virus (if they were even able to obtain it). All of which would require significant money.” Moreover, as Kuiken pointed out, the DIY community is well aware of such risks. Todd Kuiken

Biohackers

Karl Gruber , Embo Reports | 5/28/2019

Having access to the technology and knowledge to create something dangerous is still a long way from actually creating it though. “Releasing a virus with the intent to cause harm is illegal,” commented Todd Kuiken, Senior Research Scholar at the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, North Carolina State University. “It's also not that simple. One would need rather sophisticated equipment to engineer, deploy and, importantly, protect themselves from such a virus (if they were even able to obtain it). All of which would require significant money.” Moreover, as Kuiken pointed out, the DIY community is well aware of such risks. • Read more »

5/16/2019Meg WilcoxCivil EatsBurgess’ concerns of farmer’s livelihoods being displaced are not unfounded, according to Todd Kuiken, senior research scholar at the Genetic Engineering & Society Center at North Carolina State University. “There are winners and losers. All of that needs to be evaluated and put on the table so people can make informed decisions.”Todd Kuiken

Synthetic Biology Is Changing What We Eat. Here’s What You Need to Know.

Meg Wilcox, Civil Eats | 5/16/2019

Burgess’ concerns of farmer’s livelihoods being displaced are not unfounded, according to Todd Kuiken, senior research scholar at the Genetic Engineering & Society Center at North Carolina State University. “There are winners and losers. All of that needs to be evaluated and put on the table so people can make informed decisions.” • Read more »

4/4/2019Niki WilsonBioscience“It's really a system based on the premise that no new laws are needed because there's no new categories of risk with genetically engineered products,” Kuzma says. “It's definitely not designed for things like gene drives.”Jennifer Kuzma

Gene Editing in the Wild: Who Decides—and How?

Niki Wilson, Bioscience | 4/4/2019

“It's really a system based on the premise that no new laws are needed because there's no new categories of risk with genetically engineered products,” Kuzma says. “It's definitely not designed for things like gene drives.” • Read more »

2/27/2019Emily PackardNC State NewsGES Executive Committee Member, Dr. Jason A. Delborne, named 2018-19 University Faculty Scholar.Jason Delborne

2018-19 University Faculty Scholars Named

Emily Packard, NC State News | 2/27/2019

GES Executive Committee Member, Dr. Jason A. Delborne, named 2018-19 University Faculty Scholar. • Read more »

2/16/2019Josh GabbatissThe Independent“People are interested in exploring the potential of biotechnology, which could be used to introduce a specific trait unto a tree species or make it resistant or tolerant a disease or pest,” said Dr Jason Delborne, a social scientist at North Carolina State University. While genetic engineering normally takes place within tight restrictions, these GM trees would be created with the express intention of spreading far and wide.Jason Delborne

Plan to plant genetically engineered trees throughout US to save dying forests

Josh Gabbatiss, The Independent | 2/16/2019

“People are interested in exploring the potential of biotechnology, which could be used to introduce a specific trait unto a tree species or make it resistant or tolerant a disease or pest,” said Dr Jason Delborne, a social scientist at North Carolina State University. While genetic engineering normally takes place within tight restrictions, these GM trees would be created with the express intention of spreading far and wide. • Read more »

2/6/2019College of ScienceClemson UniversityFred Gould, a professor of entomology and plant pathology and the William Neal Reynolds Professor of Agriculture at North Carolina State University, spoke on the ethics of genetic manipulations and biotechnology at noon Feb. 1 in the Watt Auditorium. This lecture titled “Responsible Innovation in Genetic Sciences: Past, Present and Future” was open to faculty, staff, and students. Here is a video of his complete lecture.Fred Gould

Video: Complete Feb. 1 lecture by geneticist Fred Gould, Responsible Innovation in Genetic Sciences: Past, Present, and Future

College of Science, Clemson University | 2/6/2019

Fred Gould, a professor of entomology and plant pathology and the William Neal Reynolds Professor of Agriculture at North Carolina State University, spoke on the ethics of genetic manipulations and biotechnology at noon Feb. 1 in the Watt Auditorium. This lecture titled “Responsible Innovation in Genetic Sciences: Past, Present and Future” was open to faculty, staff, and students. Here is a video of his complete lecture. • Read more »

2/1/2019Ashley P. TaylorThe ScientistOf course, not everyone in the US believes that less regulation is better. As Kuzma writes in a recent review article, most consumers want the government to ensure the safety of genetically modified crops, and 60 percent of biotech experts she surveyed support some kind of pre-market oversight. Jennifer Kuzma

Companies Use CRISPR to Improve Crops

Ashley P. Taylor, The Scientist | 2/1/2019

Of course, not everyone in the US believes that less regulation is better. As Kuzma writes in a recent review article, most consumers want the government to ensure the safety of genetically modified crops, and 60 percent of biotech experts she surveyed support some kind of pre-market oversight. • Read more »

1/30/2019Erin MagnerWell and Good“The first generation of genetically engineered foods took a gene from bacteria that killed insects and put it into plants,” [Kuzma] says. “When grown in a field, these plants kill insects on their own, so farmers can use fewer pesticides.”Jennifer Kuzma

Okay, Let's Settle This—Are GMOs Bad for You or Not?

Erin Magner, Well and Good | 1/30/2019

“The first generation of genetically engineered foods took a gene from bacteria that killed insects and put it into plants,” [Kuzma] says. “When grown in a field, these plants kill insects on their own, so farmers can use fewer pesticides.” • Read more »

1/24/2019John Rennie and Jordana CepelewiczQuantaFred Gould, an entomologist and evolutionary biologist at North Carolina State University, likens gene drives to the fictional substance ice-nine in Kurt Vonnegut’s novel Cat’s Cradle: a bizarre form of ice that freezes all other water it touches. Gene drives spread fast because they are sets of genetic elements that spontaneously copy themselves from a maternal chromosome to a matching paternal one or vice versa. Fred Gould

Gene Drives Work in Mice (if They’re Female)

John Rennie and Jordana Cepelewicz, Quanta | 1/24/2019

Fred Gould, an entomologist and evolutionary biologist at North Carolina State University, likens gene drives to the fictional substance ice-nine in Kurt Vonnegut’s novel Cat’s Cradle: a bizarre form of ice that freezes all other water it touches. Gene drives spread fast because they are sets of genetic elements that spontaneously copy themselves from a maternal chromosome to a matching paternal one or vice versa. • Read more »

1/21/2019Natalie KoflerEarth Island JournalJennifer Kuzma, the co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State has written extensively on this topic. She argues that one reason we are witnessing immense public pushback over GMO foods is because societal values are not considered when regulatory decisions are made in the US. Jennifer Kuzma

Tempering Tech with Collective Wisdom

Natalie Kofler, Earth Island Journal | 1/21/2019

Jennifer Kuzma, the co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State has written extensively on this topic. She argues that one reason we are witnessing immense public pushback over GMO foods is because societal values are not considered when regulatory decisions are made in the US. • Read more »

1/18/2019Jason A. DelborneThe ConversationWhich would reduce wildness more – the introduction of a biotech tree or the eradication of an important tree species? There are no right or wrong answers to these questions, but they remind us of the complexity of decisions to use technology to enhance “nature.”Jason Delborne

Can genetic engineering save disappearing forests?

Jason A. Delborne, The Conversation | 1/18/2019

Which would reduce wildness more – the introduction of a biotech tree or the eradication of an important tree species? There are no right or wrong answers to these questions, but they remind us of the complexity of decisions to use technology to enhance “nature.” • Read more »

1/15/2019Office of News and Public InformationNational Academy of SciencesBiotechnology has the potential to help mitigate threats to North American forests from insects and pathogens through the introduction of pest-resistant traits to forest trees. However, many gaps in knowledge remain, particularly related to tree genetics, effects on the environment, and the public’s understanding of the technology. The report examines the potential of biotechnology to mitigate threats to forest tree health; identifies the ecological, ethical, and social implications of deploying biotechnology in forests, and develops a research agenda to address the knowledge gaps.Download the Report | Report Highlights | Press Release | Presentation Slides | Watch the webinar recording below:Jason Delborne

Forest Health and Biotechnology Report, Webinar, Press Release, and Slides Posted

Office of News and Public Information, National Academy of Sciences | 1/15/2019

Biotechnology has the potential to help mitigate threats to North American forests from insects and pathogens through the introduction of pest-resistant traits to forest trees. However, many gaps in knowledge remain, particularly related to tree genetics, effects on the environment, and the public’s understanding of the technology. The report examines the potential of biotechnology to mitigate threats to forest tree health; identifies the ecological, ethical, and social implications of deploying biotechnology in forests, and develops a research agenda to address the knowledge gaps.Download the Report | Report Highlights | Press Release | Presentation Slides | Watch the webinar recording below: • Read more »

1/14/2019David TenenbaumPhys.orgThe new analysis grew from the Third Sackler Colloquium on The Science of Science Communication, and was performed by Brossard, Pam Belluck, a science journalist at The New York Times, and Fred Gould, a professor of agriculture with a specialty in entomology at North Carolina State University. "Our aim," the authors write, "is therefore to use our collective experiences and knowledge to highlight how the current debate about gene drives could benefit from lessons learned from other contexts and sound communication approaches involving multiple actors."Fred Gould

Post-normal' science requires unorthodox communication strategies, study says

David Tenenbaum, Phys.org | 1/14/2019

The new analysis grew from the Third Sackler Colloquium on The Science of Science Communication, and was performed by Brossard, Pam Belluck, a science journalist at The New York Times, and Fred Gould, a professor of agriculture with a specialty in entomology at North Carolina State University. "Our aim," the authors write, "is therefore to use our collective experiences and knowledge to highlight how the current debate about gene drives could benefit from lessons learned from other contexts and sound communication approaches involving multiple actors." • Read more »

1/10/2019John FialkaScientific AmericanIn a press conference on Tuesday, Jason Delborne, an assistant professor at North Carolina State University, noted that most studies on using biotechnology to protect forests have been done in Canada and Europe. Relatively little work is underway in the United States. He and other members of the panel stressed that more public funds are needed to expand tree breeding programs and the use of biotechnological tools such as genetic editing...Jason Delborne

Biotech Could Modify Trees to Protect Against Pests

John Fialka, Scientific American | 1/10/2019

In a press conference on Tuesday, Jason Delborne, an assistant professor at North Carolina State University, noted that most studies on using biotechnology to protect forests have been done in Canada and Europe. Relatively little work is underway in the United States. He and other members of the panel stressed that more public funds are needed to expand tree breeding programs and the use of biotechnological tools such as genetic editing... • Read more »

1/8/2019Susan E. Offutt, Vikram E. Chhatre, Jason A. Delborne, et al.National Academies of ScienceCOMMITTEE ON THE POTENTIAL FOR BIOTECHNOLOGY TO ADDRESS FOREST HEALTH: Susan E. Offutt (Chair), U.S. Government Accountability Office (retired); Vikram E. Chhatre, University of Wyoming; Jason A. Delborne, North Carolina State University; Stephen DiFazio, West Virginia University; Doria R. Gordon, Environmental Defense Fund; Inés Ibáñez, University of Michigan; Gregory Jaffe, Center for Science in the Public Interest;Jason Delborne, Ronald Sederoff

HIGHLIGHTS - Forest Health and Biotechnology: Possibilities and Considerations Report

Susan E. Offutt, Vikram E. Chhatre, Jason A. Delborne, et al., National Academies of Science | 1/8/2019

COMMITTEE ON THE POTENTIAL FOR BIOTECHNOLOGY TO ADDRESS FOREST HEALTH: Susan E. Offutt (Chair), U.S. Government Accountability Office (retired); Vikram E. Chhatre, University of Wyoming; Jason A. Delborne, North Carolina State University; Stephen DiFazio, West Virginia University; Doria R. Gordon, Environmental Defense Fund; Inés Ibáñez, University of Michigan; Gregory Jaffe, Center for Science in the Public Interest; • Read more »

1/3/2019Antonio RegaladoMIT Technology ReviewHeike Sederoff, a plant scientist at NC State who has carried out related laboratory studies, describes the new report, published in the journal Science, as the first time such large gains have been seen in a field trial of this type. “It confirms the potential for real agricultural benefits,” she says.Heike Sederoff

Gene engineers make super-size plants that are 40% larger

Antonio Regalado, MIT Technology Review | 1/3/2019

Heike Sederoff, a plant scientist at NC State who has carried out related laboratory studies, describes the new report, published in the journal Science, as the first time such large gains have been seen in a field trial of this type. “It confirms the potential for real agricultural benefits,” she says. • Read more »

12/18/2018Jonathan O'CallaghanWired“I think it’s a matter of a decade or so when it could become very routine and easy to do,” says Jennifer Kuzma, a genetic engineering expert at North Carolina State University.Jennifer Kuzma

Science is racing to stop another CRISPR baby from being born

Jonathan O'Callaghan, Wired | 12/18/2018

“I think it’s a matter of a decade or so when it could become very routine and easy to do,” says Jennifer Kuzma, a genetic engineering expert at North Carolina State University. • Read more »

12/17/2018Carolyn Y. JohnsonWashington Post“We’re at this inflection point in society, where gene editing is really taking off, and now is the time we could have a more sustained public conversation about how we want it used in our world and how we don’t want it to be used,” said Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. “All the polls indicate that people are less comfortable with animal biotechnology than plant biotechnology… A regulatory system cannot be based 100 percent on science or scientific risk, and values come into play when setting the standards.”Jennifer Kuzma

Gene-edited farm animals are coming. Will we eat them?

Carolyn Y. Johnson, Washington Post | 12/17/2018

“We’re at this inflection point in society, where gene editing is really taking off, and now is the time we could have a more sustained public conversation about how we want it used in our world and how we don’t want it to be used,” said Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. “All the polls indicate that people are less comfortable with animal biotechnology than plant biotechnology… A regulatory system cannot be based 100 percent on science or scientific risk, and values come into play when setting the standards.” • Read more »

12/11/2018Ben CreaghCSIRO ECOSDr. Jason Delborne, Associate Professor of Science, Policy and Society at North Carolina State University, dislikes the term ‘social license to operate’. “It has some assumptions built in that are problematic. It invokes the metaphor of a government licence, which is like a one-time permit. It suggests that once you get it, you’re off and running. And what I’m interested in is the kind of engagement that’s ongoing. There is no particular moment in time when you achieve social license.Jason Delborne, John Godwin

Transparency in science: Talking about the potential of gene editing for conservation

Ben Creagh, CSIRO ECOS | 12/11/2018

Dr. Jason Delborne, Associate Professor of Science, Policy and Society at North Carolina State University, dislikes the term ‘social license to operate’. “It has some assumptions built in that are problematic. It invokes the metaphor of a government licence, which is like a one-time permit. It suggests that once you get it, you’re off and running. And what I’m interested in is the kind of engagement that’s ongoing. There is no particular moment in time when you achieve social license. • Read more »

12/5/2018Chukwuma MuanyaThe Guardian“The member states are hearing and thinking that these are sitting in the lab ready to be released, and that is not the case,” says Kuiken. “Nothing I have seen suggested these things are literally ready to go out the door tomorrow. We could have better decisions if everyone knew they could take a breath.”Todd Kuiken

Debate rages on first gene-edited babies, drives to eliminate diseases

Chukwuma Muanya, The Guardian | 12/5/2018

“The member states are hearing and thinking that these are sitting in the lab ready to be released, and that is not the case,” says Kuiken. “Nothing I have seen suggested these things are literally ready to go out the door tomorrow. We could have better decisions if everyone knew they could take a breath.” • Read more »

11/29/2018Ewan CallawayNature Todd Kuiken, a biotechnology-policy specialist at North Carolina State University in Raleigh who is part of an expert panel that advises the CBD on gene drives, says that it will take time to parse the language agreed today. The text must be interpreted by the countries that will ultimately license any gene-drive release — and thus he sees no quick end to the debate.Todd Kuiken

UN treaty agrees to limit gene drives but rejects a moratorium

Ewan Callaway, Nature | 11/29/2018

Todd Kuiken, a biotechnology-policy specialist at North Carolina State University in Raleigh who is part of an expert panel that advises the CBD on gene drives, says that it will take time to parse the language agreed today. The text must be interpreted by the countries that will ultimately license any gene-drive release — and thus he sees no quick end to the debate. • Read more »

11/28/2018Lauren KirkpatrickNC State Humanities and Social Sciences NewsJennifer Kuzma has been elected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Kuzma is the college’s Goodnight-North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation Distinguished Professor in Social Sciences. She co-directs NC State’s Genetic Engineering and Society Center.Jennifer Kuzma

Kudos to Kuzma: Distinguished Professor Named AAAS Fellow

Lauren Kirkpatrick, NC State Humanities and Social Sciences News | 11/28/2018

Jennifer Kuzma has been elected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Kuzma is the college’s Goodnight-North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation Distinguished Professor in Social Sciences. She co-directs NC State’s Genetic Engineering and Society Center. • Read more »

11/28/2018Jonathan O'CallaghanWIRED U.K.He’s research has highlighted that there is not really a way to stop rogue actors in some countries doing experiments like this. And as the technique becomes easier and easier, we will almost certainly see a rise in the amount of gene-editing take place. “I think it’s a matter of a decade or so when it could become very routine and easy to do,” says Jennifer Kuzma, a genetic engineering expert at North Carolina State University.Jennifer Kuzma

Science is racing to stop another CRISPR baby from being born

Jonathan O'Callaghan, WIRED U.K. | 11/28/2018

He’s research has highlighted that there is not really a way to stop rogue actors in some countries doing experiments like this. And as the technique becomes easier and easier, we will almost certainly see a rise in the amount of gene-editing take place. “I think it’s a matter of a decade or so when it could become very routine and easy to do,” says Jennifer Kuzma, a genetic engineering expert at North Carolina State University. • Read more »

11/16/2018Kenneth MillerLeaps MagazineYet some experts suggest that the broadly permissive American approach and the broadly restrictive EU policy are equally flawed. “What’s behind these regulatory decisions is not science,” says Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, a former advisor to the World Economic Forum, who has researched and written extensively on governance issues in biotechnology. “It’s politics, economics, and culture.”Jennifer Kuzma

What’s the Right Way to Regulate Gene-Edited Crops?

Kenneth Miller, Leaps Magazine | 11/16/2018

Yet some experts suggest that the broadly permissive American approach and the broadly restrictive EU policy are equally flawed. “What’s behind these regulatory decisions is not science,” says Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, a former advisor to the World Economic Forum, who has researched and written extensively on governance issues in biotechnology. “It’s politics, economics, and culture.” • Read more »

11/15/2018Ewan CallawayNatureOne probable outcome of the meeting is an outline for future work on policy issues raised by organisms carrying gene drives, says Todd Kuiken, a biotechnology-policy specialist at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, who is also on the CBD’s synthetic-biology expert panel.Todd Kuiken

Ban on ‘gene drives’ is back on the UN’s agenda — worrying scientists

Ewan Callaway, Nature | 11/15/2018

One probable outcome of the meeting is an outline for future work on policy issues raised by organisms carrying gene drives, says Todd Kuiken, a biotechnology-policy specialist at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, who is also on the CBD’s synthetic-biology expert panel. • Read more »

11/14/2018Associated PressNew York Post“Most gene-edited plants and animals are probably going to be just fine to eat. But you’re only going to do yourself a disservice in the long run if you hide behind the terminology,” Kuzma said.Jennifer Kuzma

The era of gene-edited food is upon us

Associated Press, New York Post | 11/14/2018

“Most gene-edited plants and animals are probably going to be just fine to eat. But you’re only going to do yourself a disservice in the long run if you hide behind the terminology,” Kuzma said. • Read more »

11/13/2018Antonio RegaladoMIT Technology ReviewAccording to Kuiken, the UN is unlikely to endorse a ban, because that requires consensus, and some countries with biotech industries are expected to oppose the measure. But the UN, which takes what’s called a “precautionary” approach to new technologies, has previously adopted restrictive language on some technologies seen as affecting the planet as a whole, including certain biotech seeds and geoengineering techniques. Todd Kuiken

United Nations considers a test ban on evolution-warping gene drives

Antonio Regalado, MIT Technology Review | 11/13/2018

According to Kuiken, the UN is unlikely to endorse a ban, because that requires consensus, and some countries with biotech industries are expected to oppose the measure. But the UN, which takes what’s called a “precautionary” approach to new technologies, has previously adopted restrictive language on some technologies seen as affecting the planet as a whole, including certain biotech seeds and geoengineering techniques. • Read more »

11/12/2018Terry GrossNPR's Fresh AirYou may be shocked by what's living in your home — the bacteria, the fungi, viruses, parasites and insects. Probably many more organisms than you imagined. "Every surface; every bit of air; every bit of water in your home is alive," says Rob Dunn, a professor of applied ecology at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. "The average house has thousands of species.Rob Dunn

Counting The Bugs And Bacteria, You're 'Never Home Alone' (And That's OK)

Terry Gross, NPR's Fresh Air | 11/12/2018

You may be shocked by what's living in your home — the bacteria, the fungi, viruses, parasites and insects. Probably many more organisms than you imagined. "Every surface; every bit of air; every bit of water in your home is alive," says Rob Dunn, a professor of applied ecology at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. "The average house has thousands of species. • Read more »

11/2/2018Natalie Kofler, James P. Collins, Jennifer Kuzma, et alScienceDr. Jennifer Kuzma, Goodnight-NC GSK Foundation Distinguished Professor and Co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, was one of the lead authors on an interdisciplinary team calling for global oversight of environmental gene editing in this Science Policy ForumJennifer Kuzma

Editing Nature: Local roots of global governance

Natalie Kofler, James P. Collins, Jennifer Kuzma, et al, Science | 11/2/2018

Dr. Jennifer Kuzma, Goodnight-NC GSK Foundation Distinguished Professor and Co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, was one of the lead authors on an interdisciplinary team calling for global oversight of environmental gene editing in this Science Policy Forum • Read more »

11/2/2018Jason Delborne, Adam Kokotovich, S. Kathleen Barnhill-DillingScienceIn his Policy Forum “Building an evidence base for stakeholder engagement” (10 August, p. 554), J. V. Lavery rightly proposes additional reporting and evidence collection to understand best practices for community and stakeholder engagement. However, we are concerned that he framed stakeholder engagement too narrowly.Jason Delborne, Adam Kokotovich, Katie Barnhill

Engaging community with humility

Jason Delborne, Adam Kokotovich, S. Kathleen Barnhill-Dilling, Science | 11/2/2018

In his Policy Forum “Building an evidence base for stakeholder engagement” (10 August, p. 554), J. V. Lavery rightly proposes additional reporting and evidence collection to understand best practices for community and stakeholder engagement. However, we are concerned that he framed stakeholder engagement too narrowly. • Read more »

10/13/2018Ryan O'SheaFuture GrindIn this installment of the Future Grind podcast host Ryan O’Shea speaks with Todd Kuiken, Senior Research Scholar at the Genetic Engineering & Society Center at North Carolina State University. In this role Todd travels the world to study biosafety and biosecurity within the do-it-yourself biology community. Todd previously spent time in Washington D.C., leading both the Wilson Center’s Synthetic Biology Project, and their the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies. They discuss his collaboration with DIYbio.org, safety within citizen science, the handling of public perception, what is holding DIYbio back, and more!Todd Kuiken

Ep. 29 - Biosafety and Biosecurity in DIYbio with Todd Kuiken

Ryan O'Shea, Future Grind | 10/13/2018

In this installment of the Future Grind podcast host Ryan O’Shea speaks with Todd Kuiken, Senior Research Scholar at the Genetic Engineering & Society Center at North Carolina State University. In this role Todd travels the world to study biosafety and biosecurity within the do-it-yourself biology community. Todd previously spent time in Washington D.C., leading both the Wilson Center’s Synthetic Biology Project, and their the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies. They discuss his collaboration with DIYbio.org, safety within citizen science, the handling of public perception, what is holding DIYbio back, and more! • Read more »

10/4/2018Candice Choi and Seth BorensteinAssociated PressNorth Carolina State University entomologist Fred Gould, who chaired a National Academy of Sciences panel on genetically modified food and is not part of the DARPA research, said too many biological interactions would need to be perfectly manipulated, so the chance of it working is “pretty close to zero.”Fred Gould

Scientists: US military program could be seen as bioweapon

Candice Choi and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press | 10/4/2018

North Carolina State University entomologist Fred Gould, who chaired a National Academy of Sciences panel on genetically modified food and is not part of the DARPA research, said too many biological interactions would need to be perfectly manipulated, so the chance of it working is “pretty close to zero.” • Read more »

10/4/2018George DvorskyGizmodo“The social, ethical, political, and ecological implications of producing HEGAAs are significant and worthy of the same level of attention as exploring the science underpinning the potential technology,” Delborne told Gizmodo. “The authors argue persuasively that specifying insects as the preferred delivery mechanism for HEGAAs is poorly justified by visions of agricultural applications. The infrastructure and expertise required for spraying agricultural fields—at least in the U.S. context—is well established, and this delivery mechanism would offer greater control over the potential spread of a HEGAA.”Jason Delborne

Scathing Report Accuses the Pentagon of Developing an Agricultural Bioweapon

George Dvorsky, Gizmodo | 10/4/2018

“The social, ethical, political, and ecological implications of producing HEGAAs are significant and worthy of the same level of attention as exploring the science underpinning the potential technology,” Delborne told Gizmodo. “The authors argue persuasively that specifying insects as the preferred delivery mechanism for HEGAAs is poorly justified by visions of agricultural applications. The infrastructure and expertise required for spraying agricultural fields—at least in the U.S. context—is well established, and this delivery mechanism would offer greater control over the potential spread of a HEGAA.” • Read more »

10/3/2018Alex McKiernanScience for the Rest of Us PodDr. Jennifer Kuzma from NC State walks us through the complicated world of regulations that control how genetically engineering plants and animals make into our world and onto our plates. Really interesting conversation with broad implications for how society regulates complex technologies.Jennifer Kuzma

Regulate This!: How Genetic Engineering is Regulated

Alex McKiernan, Science for the Rest of Us Pod | 10/3/2018

Dr. Jennifer Kuzma from NC State walks us through the complicated world of regulations that control how genetically engineering plants and animals make into our world and onto our plates. Really interesting conversation with broad implications for how society regulates complex technologies. • Read more »

9/24/2018Megan MolteniWIRED“There are some unique dimensions to this that put us in uncharted territory,” says Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. One of the issues is that gene drives are designed to spread. That makes it next to impossible to do confined field trials, as is traditional for genetically modified crops. Jennifer Kuzma

Here's the Plan to End Malaria with Crispr-Edited Mosquitoes

Megan Molteni, WIRED | 9/24/2018

“There are some unique dimensions to this that put us in uncharted territory,” says Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. One of the issues is that gene drives are designed to spread. That makes it next to impossible to do confined field trials, as is traditional for genetically modified crops. • Read more »

9/24/2018Warren CornwallScience“This is really critical,” says Fred Gould, an entomologist at North Carolina State University in Raleigh who was not involved in the work. The study challenges the conventional wisdom that animals are immune to glyphosate because it targets a cellular mechanism particular to plants and some bacteria. “I was surprised.”Fred Gould

Common weed killer—believed harmless to animals—may be harming bees worldwide

Warren Cornwall, Science | 9/24/2018

“This is really critical,” says Fred Gould, an entomologist at North Carolina State University in Raleigh who was not involved in the work. The study challenges the conventional wisdom that animals are immune to glyphosate because it targets a cellular mechanism particular to plants and some bacteria. “I was surprised.” • Read more »

9/24/2018Hannah OsborneNewsweekFred Gould, distinguished professor of entomology at North Carolina State University, who was not involved in the study, said the results were very promising. “This is a big step forward,” he told Newsweek. “There was huge excitement over using CRISPR for gene drive to fight malaria, but in the first studies the mosquitoes evolved resistance to the drive very quickly. The innovative approach used in this study suggests a way around the problem of resistance. If the drive mechanism functions under diverse environmental conditions and resistance doesn’t evolve when this approach is used on a larger experimental scale, this will be a major breakthrough on the road to suppression of malaria.”Fred Gould

Malaria and CRISPR: Gene-editing causes complete collapse of mosquito population in 'major breakthrough' for disease eradication

Hannah Osborne, Newsweek | 9/24/2018

Fred Gould, distinguished professor of entomology at North Carolina State University, who was not involved in the study, said the results were very promising. “This is a big step forward,” he told Newsweek. “There was huge excitement over using CRISPR for gene drive to fight malaria, but in the first studies the mosquitoes evolved resistance to the drive very quickly. The innovative approach used in this study suggests a way around the problem of resistance. If the drive mechanism functions under diverse environmental conditions and resistance doesn’t evolve when this approach is used on a larger experimental scale, this will be a major breakthrough on the road to suppression of malaria.” • Read more »

9/6/2018Dee ShoreNC State NewsWith support from NC State’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, College of Humanities and Social Sciences and the university provost, plus a $3 million grant awarded this week by the National Science Foundation’s Research Traineeship (NRT) program, center leaders and other university faculty members plan to implement a program called AgBioFEWS, or Agricultural Biotechnology in Our Evolving Food, Energy and Water Systems.Fred Gould

Changing the Landscape of Graduate Education

Dee Shore, NC State News | 9/6/2018

With support from NC State’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, College of Humanities and Social Sciences and the university provost, plus a $3 million grant awarded this week by the National Science Foundation’s Research Traineeship (NRT) program, center leaders and other university faculty members plan to implement a program called AgBioFEWS, or Agricultural Biotechnology in Our Evolving Food, Energy and Water Systems. • Read more »

8/28/2018Sarasota Herald TribuneCaitlin DeweyJennifer Kuzma

Processed Food: Genetically modified or gene-edited: Is there a difference?

, Sarasota Herald Tribune | 8/28/2018

Caitlin Dewey • Read more »

8/27/2018Rick MullinChemical & Engineering NewsScientists who refuse to engage with ethicists and the public will find themselves at a disadvantage. “Just because you are a scientist and have invented something doesn’t mean you have authority over it,” says Fred Gould, an entomologist and co-director of the Genetic Engineering & Society Center at North Carolina State University. He points to the National Academies report’s advocacy of participatory decision-making. Resistance from the science community based on ethicists and the public not fully understanding the science wears thin, he says. “You are a pretty poor scientist if you can’t explain what these things are about to an ethicist,” he says.Fred Gould

Building bioethics into the future of life sciences innovation

Rick Mullin, Chemical & Engineering News | 8/27/2018

Scientists who refuse to engage with ethicists and the public will find themselves at a disadvantage. “Just because you are a scientist and have invented something doesn’t mean you have authority over it,” says Fred Gould, an entomologist and co-director of the Genetic Engineering & Society Center at North Carolina State University. He points to the National Academies report’s advocacy of participatory decision-making. Resistance from the science community based on ethicists and the public not fully understanding the science wears thin, he says. “You are a pretty poor scientist if you can’t explain what these things are about to an ethicist,” he says. • Read more »

8/17/2018Maggie FoxNBC News“With all things, it is the level of exposure that matters,” said Fred Gould, head of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. “The poison is in the concentration.”Fred Gould

Weed killer in your cereal? Maybe, but don't panic

Maggie Fox, NBC News | 8/17/2018

“With all things, it is the level of exposure that matters,” said Fred Gould, head of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. “The poison is in the concentration.” • Read more »

8/11/2018Caitlin DeweyWashington Post“We need a mandatory regulatory process: not just for scientific reasons, but for consumer and public confidence,” Kuzma said. “I think the vast majority of gene-edited foods are going to be as safe as their conventionally bred counterparts. But I don’t buy into the argument that’s true all the time for every crop.”Jennifer Kuzma

The Future of Food: Scientists have found a fast and cheap way to edit your food's DNA

Caitlin Dewey, Washington Post | 8/11/2018

“We need a mandatory regulatory process: not just for scientific reasons, but for consumer and public confidence,” Kuzma said. “I think the vast majority of gene-edited foods are going to be as safe as their conventionally bred counterparts. But I don’t buy into the argument that’s true all the time for every crop.” • Read more »

8/6/2018Todd KuikenGES CenterOPINION | The recent European Union ruling regarding gene-edited plants and GMO crops is more status quo than ground breaking or disruptive.Todd Kuiken

EU ruling on gene-edited plants and GMOs is more status quo than disruptive

Todd Kuiken, GES Center | 8/6/2018

OPINION | The recent European Union ruling regarding gene-edited plants and GMO crops is more status quo than ground breaking or disruptive. • Read more »

8/2/2018Marla Vacek BroadfootNC State AlumniRodolphe Barrangou ’00 MS, ’04 Ph.D., felt out of place. There he was, his sleek 6-foot-2 frame tucked into a new tuxedo, mingling at an opulent hall at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. Champagne was poured, awards were given, speeches were made. At one point, he found himself posing for pictures with Anthony Fauci, a renowned HIV/AIDS researcher. “It’s a fluke!” Barrangou recalls thinking at the time, no doubt struck with a bout of imposter syndrome. “I’m here with Tony Fauci! He’s saved millions of lives. What have I done?”Rodolphe Barrangou

The CRISPR whisperer

Marla Vacek Broadfoot, NC State Alumni | 8/2/2018

Rodolphe Barrangou ’00 MS, ’04 Ph.D., felt out of place. There he was, his sleek 6-foot-2 frame tucked into a new tuxedo, mingling at an opulent hall at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. Champagne was poured, awards were given, speeches were made. At one point, he found himself posing for pictures with Anthony Fauci, a renowned HIV/AIDS researcher. “It’s a fluke!” Barrangou recalls thinking at the time, no doubt struck with a bout of imposter syndrome. “I’m here with Tony Fauci! He’s saved millions of lives. What have I done?” • Read more »

7/27/2018Carl ZimmerNew York TimesIn Europe, plants created with gene-editing technologies will be stringently regulated as G.M.O.’s. But older crops whose DNA has been altered will be left alone.Jennifer Kuzma

What Is a Genetically Modified Crop? A European Ruling Sows Confusion

Carl Zimmer, New York Times | 7/27/2018

In Europe, plants created with gene-editing technologies will be stringently regulated as G.M.O.’s. But older crops whose DNA has been altered will be left alone. • Read more »

7/19/2018Aki ItoBloombergKuzma also says there needs to be a broader conversation about the underlying ethics of the technology. “With these genetic engineering techniques becoming easier to implement and more powerful too, we’re at a critical point where things could change in the natural world,” she says.Jennifer Kuzma

This Man Rewrites the Genetic Code of Animals

Aki Ito, Bloomberg | 7/19/2018

Kuzma also says there needs to be a broader conversation about the underlying ethics of the technology. “With these genetic engineering techniques becoming easier to implement and more powerful too, we’re at a critical point where things could change in the natural world,” she says. • Read more »

6/29/2018Tracey PeakeNC State News PodcastIn this episode we talk with Fred Gould, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Agriculture and Life Sciences, about the rising rates of herbicide and pesticide resistance, the current state of the resistance arms race and what we need to do in the future to protect our crops and human health from resistant pests.Fred Gould

Pesticide Resistance Arms Race

Tracey Peake, NC State News Podcast | 6/29/2018

In this episode we talk with Fred Gould, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Agriculture and Life Sciences, about the rising rates of herbicide and pesticide resistance, the current state of the resistance arms race and what we need to do in the future to protect our crops and human health from resistant pests. • Read more »

6/25/2018Julia RosenHigh Country NewsTo critics, the case laid bare glaring weaknesses in the country’s oversight of genetically engineered, or GE, crops. While biotechnology’s defenders say the process is already overly rigorous, others have long argued that regulations, which haven’t changed significantly since 1987, don’t do enough to protect agriculture and the environment. Neither the USDA nor any government agency must weigh the full social, economic and ecological impacts of GE products, says Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. “There’s really no place that’s looking at this broadly from a risk-benefit perspective.”Jennifer Kuzma

GMO grass is creeping across Oregon

Julia Rosen, High Country News | 6/25/2018

To critics, the case laid bare glaring weaknesses in the country’s oversight of genetically engineered, or GE, crops. While biotechnology’s defenders say the process is already overly rigorous, others have long argued that regulations, which haven’t changed significantly since 1987, don’t do enough to protect agriculture and the environment. Neither the USDA nor any government agency must weigh the full social, economic and ecological impacts of GE products, says Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. “There’s really no place that’s looking at this broadly from a risk-benefit perspective.” • Read more »

6/21/2018Insider Staff ReportScienceJennifer Kuzma, a social scientist who co-directs the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, likes the idea—not a new one—of housing food safety within one agency but questions whether USDA’s mission to promote agriculture industry makes it a good fit. An agency dedicated to protecting public health or the environment would make more sense, she says.Jennifer Kuzma

Trump’s plan to reshuffle government strikes familiar notes

Insider Staff Report, Science | 6/21/2018

Jennifer Kuzma, a social scientist who co-directs the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, likes the idea—not a new one—of housing food safety within one agency but questions whether USDA’s mission to promote agriculture industry makes it a good fit. An agency dedicated to protecting public health or the environment would make more sense, she says. • Read more »

6/18/2018Brooke BorelScientific AmericanAlthough academics and companies are looking for technical alternatives such as sprays made from biological compounds, a recent review by researchers at North Carolina State University cautions that society may not be able to science its way out of this thorny problem. There is a “considerable chance,” the authors write, “that the evolution of pest resistance will outpace human innovation.” Addressing the situation requires a collective effort between funding agencies, regulators, farmers and others, the authors add in the review, published in Science. “We need to approach things from more than a single technical fix,” says co-author Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NC State.Jennifer Kuzma

Weeds Are Winning in the War against Herbicide Resistance

Brooke Borel, Scientific American | 6/18/2018

Although academics and companies are looking for technical alternatives such as sprays made from biological compounds, a recent review by researchers at North Carolina State University cautions that society may not be able to science its way out of this thorny problem. There is a “considerable chance,” the authors write, “that the evolution of pest resistance will outpace human innovation.” Addressing the situation requires a collective effort between funding agencies, regulators, farmers and others, the authors add in the review, published in Science. “We need to approach things from more than a single technical fix,” says co-author Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NC State. • Read more »

6/4/2018Daniel GrushkinStat NewsTodd Kuiken, a researcher at North Carolina State University, and I combatted these myths in “Seven Myths and Realities about Do-It-Yourself Biology,” a report that was published by the Woodrow Wilson Center.Todd Kuiken

Biohackers are about open-access to science, not DIY pandemics. Stop misrepresenting us

Daniel Grushkin, Stat News | 6/4/2018

Todd Kuiken, a researcher at North Carolina State University, and I combatted these myths in “Seven Myths and Realities about Do-It-Yourself Biology,” a report that was published by the Woodrow Wilson Center. • Read more »

6/1/2018Leslie StahlWorld Science FestivalWatch: GES Co-director Fred Gould discussing the origins of agricultural genetic engineering, CRISPR, & using the technology to combat diseases like malariaFred Gould

Rewriting Life: The Promise And Peril Of Editing Your DNA

Leslie Stahl, World Science Festival | 6/1/2018

Watch: GES Co-director Fred Gould discussing the origins of agricultural genetic engineering, CRISPR, & using the technology to combat diseases like malaria • Read more »

5/21/2018Andrew Maynard and Heather RossFuture Out Loud podcastAndrew Maynard and Heather Ross talk with senior researcher and DIY Bio expert Dr. Todd Kuiken at the 2018 Governance of Emerging Technologies and Science conference, about the present and future of DIY bio communities in the U.S. and worldwide.Todd Kuiken

DIY Biohacking, with Todd Kuiken

Andrew Maynard and Heather Ross, Future Out Loud podcast | 5/21/2018

Andrew Maynard and Heather Ross talk with senior researcher and DIY Bio expert Dr. Todd Kuiken at the 2018 Governance of Emerging Technologies and Science conference, about the present and future of DIY bio communities in the U.S. and worldwide. • Read more »

5/18/2018Fred Gould, Zachary S. Brown, Jennifer KuzmaScienceResistance to insecticides and herbicides has cost billions of U.S. dollars in the agricultural sector and could result in millions of lives lost to insect-vectored diseases. We mostly continue to use pesticides as if resistance is a temporary issue that will be addressed by commercialization of new pesticides with novel modes of action. However, current evidence suggests that insect and weed evolution may outstrip our ability to replace outmoded chemicals and other control mechanisms. To avoid this outcome, we must address the mix of ecological, genetic, economic, and sociopolitical factors that prevent implementation of sustainable pest management practices. We offer an ambitious proposition.Fred Gould, Zack Brown, Jennifer Kuzma

Wicked evolution: Can we address the sociobiological dilemma of pesticide resistance?

Fred Gould, Zachary S. Brown, Jennifer Kuzma, Science | 5/18/2018

Resistance to insecticides and herbicides has cost billions of U.S. dollars in the agricultural sector and could result in millions of lives lost to insect-vectored diseases. We mostly continue to use pesticides as if resistance is a temporary issue that will be addressed by commercialization of new pesticides with novel modes of action. However, current evidence suggests that insect and weed evolution may outstrip our ability to replace outmoded chemicals and other control mechanisms. To avoid this outcome, we must address the mix of ecological, genetic, economic, and sociopolitical factors that prevent implementation of sustainable pest management practices. We offer an ambitious proposition. • Read more »

5/17/2018Fred Gould, Mick KulikowskiNC State News“What is the impact on people if these herbicides and pesticides run out?” said Fred Gould, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Agriculture at NC State and the corresponding author of the paper. “Resistance to pesticides is rising in critical weed and insect species, threatening our ability to harness these pests. Weed species have evolved resistance to every class of herbicide in use, and more than 550 arthropods have resistance to at least one pesticide.”Fred Gould, Zack Brown, Jennifer Kuzma

What Happens If We Run Out? Pesticide Resistance Needs Attention, Large-Scale Study

Fred Gould, Mick Kulikowski, NC State News | 5/17/2018

“What is the impact on people if these herbicides and pesticides run out?” said Fred Gould, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Agriculture at NC State and the corresponding author of the paper. “Resistance to pesticides is rising in critical weed and insect species, threatening our ability to harness these pests. Weed species have evolved resistance to every class of herbicide in use, and more than 550 arthropods have resistance to at least one pesticide.” • Read more »

5/10/2018Kelly ServickScienceThe regulatory conundrum facing lab-grown meat—like debates about oversight of genetic engineering—are signs of a regulatory system that hasn’t kept pace with technological advances, says Todd Kuiken, an environmental scientist who studies biotech regulation at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. “We’re in crazy land now. … There’s so much coming at us, that it’s really hard to keep track of all the new products and changing technologies,” he says. “And now we’re getting actual products ready to go and no one’s quite sure what to do with them.”Todd Kuiken

As lab-grown meat advances, U.S. lawmakers call for regulation

Kelly Servick, Science | 5/10/2018

The regulatory conundrum facing lab-grown meat—like debates about oversight of genetic engineering—are signs of a regulatory system that hasn’t kept pace with technological advances, says Todd Kuiken, an environmental scientist who studies biotech regulation at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. “We’re in crazy land now. … There’s so much coming at us, that it’s really hard to keep track of all the new products and changing technologies,” he says. “And now we’re getting actual products ready to go and no one’s quite sure what to do with them.” • Read more »

5/1/2018Emily PackardNC State Provost NewsJennifer Kuzma: Recognized by Provost for dedication to teaching, research and engagementJennifer Kuzma

NC State Recognizes Exceptional Faculty

Emily Packard, NC State Provost News | 5/1/2018

Jennifer Kuzma: Recognized by Provost for dedication to teaching, research and engagement • Read more »

4/25/2018Joshua ColburnSciLineJennifer Kuzma: Gene drives and responsible innovationJennifer Kuzma

AAAS Sciline Gene Drives media briefing for journalists

Joshua Colburn, SciLine | 4/25/2018

Jennifer Kuzma: Gene drives and responsible innovation • Read more »

4/15/2018Jacob Bunge and Amy Dockser MarcusWall Street JournalProfessor Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, says she understands why companies want to stay away from the GMO label, but says referring to the new gene-editing techniques as breeding “seems a little disingenuous.” “It is a biotech-improved crop,” she says. “Something along those lines would be more honest and is more likely not to come back and bite them in the future if consumers find out it is not really just breeding, it’s something more.”Jennifer Kuzma

Is This Tomato Engineered? Inside the Coming Battle Over Gene-Edited Food

Jacob Bunge and Amy Dockser Marcus, Wall Street Journal | 4/15/2018

Professor Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, says she understands why companies want to stay away from the GMO label, but says referring to the new gene-editing techniques as breeding “seems a little disingenuous.” “It is a biotech-improved crop,” she says. “Something along those lines would be more honest and is more likely not to come back and bite them in the future if consumers find out it is not really just breeding, it’s something more.” • Read more »

4/6/2018Paul VincelliTalking Biotech PodcastDr. Kuzma speaks with Dr. Paul Vincelli (@Pvincell) about the social and political considerations of gene drives. She discusses ethics, policy and regulation, as well surprising imperatives where gene drives may be necessary for conservation or human health. Jennifer Kuzma

Insect Gene Drives, Part 2 - with Jennifer Kuzma

Paul Vincelli, Talking Biotech Podcast | 4/6/2018

Dr. Kuzma speaks with Dr. Paul Vincelli (@Pvincell) about the social and political considerations of gene drives. She discusses ethics, policy and regulation, as well surprising imperatives where gene drives may be necessary for conservation or human health. • Read more »

4/5/2018Martin HahnCrisprcas12aTodd Kuiken, an environmentally friendly scientist, claims that leading bio scientists increasingly feel they do not need a PhD being a scientist. He claims that any strong, scientifically inclined mind is able to help the body of science. The greater minds that are devoted to solving the world’s medical problems, the more rapidly the human race will be able to solve them.Todd Kuiken

Future Job: Freelance Biohackers

Martin Hahn, Crisprcas12a | 4/5/2018

Todd Kuiken, an environmentally friendly scientist, claims that leading bio scientists increasingly feel they do not need a PhD being a scientist. He claims that any strong, scientifically inclined mind is able to help the body of science. The greater minds that are devoted to solving the world’s medical problems, the more rapidly the human race will be able to solve them. • Read more »

3/31/2018Paul VincelliTalking Biotech PodcastGene drives are a powerful technology that may be used to control pests. The concepts key off of exploiting genetic vulnerabilities that are rapidly inherited, and cause populations to crash over a short time. Such instances happen naturally, but now scientists are engineering the genetics of pests to induce steep population declines from gene drives. Dr. Fred Gould from North Carolina State University discusses the technology, its risks, regulation and some of the social aspects of application of the science.Fred Gould

Insect Gene Drives, Part 1 - with Fred Gould

Paul Vincelli, Talking Biotech Podcast | 3/31/2018

Gene drives are a powerful technology that may be used to control pests. The concepts key off of exploiting genetic vulnerabilities that are rapidly inherited, and cause populations to crash over a short time. Such instances happen naturally, but now scientists are engineering the genetics of pests to induce steep population declines from gene drives. Dr. Fred Gould from North Carolina State University discusses the technology, its risks, regulation and some of the social aspects of application of the science. • Read more »

3/8/2018Kathiann KowalskiScience News for Students“Do we as humans really have the right to do this?” Kuiken asks. That’s a big question. What he means is that there’s a lot at stake with a version of a gene drive that is designed to spread a change in the environment forever. Even with the daisy chain, he wonders whether humans have the right “to remove one species from one area where we don’t want it, or that we don’t think is good for it.”Todd Kuiken

Would DNA Be Able To Altering Save Imperiled Species?

Kathiann Kowalski, Science News for Students | 3/8/2018

“Do we as humans really have the right to do this?” Kuiken asks. That’s a big question. What he means is that there’s a lot at stake with a version of a gene drive that is designed to spread a change in the environment forever. Even with the daisy chain, he wonders whether humans have the right “to remove one species from one area where we don’t want it, or that we don’t think is good for it.” • Read more »

2/24/2018Katherine WilsonThe Sydney Morning HeraldLast May, GBIRd's Todd Kuiken expressed concern about DARPA "bending the entire field of synthetic biology towards military applications." In July, Packard instructed the group to target Kuiken with "specific in-reach" and "remind him he's on the GBIRd team, despite his personal views about DARPA". He emailed Kuiken, telling him to "align your messaging" and "avoid criticising GBIRd and our pursuit of DARPA".Todd Kuiken

Could WA be the genetic testing ground for 'synthetic mice' to end mice?

Katherine Wilson, The Sydney Morning Herald | 2/24/2018

Last May, GBIRd's Todd Kuiken expressed concern about DARPA "bending the entire field of synthetic biology towards military applications." In July, Packard instructed the group to target Kuiken with "specific in-reach" and "remind him he's on the GBIRd team, despite his personal views about DARPA". He emailed Kuiken, telling him to "align your messaging" and "avoid criticising GBIRd and our pursuit of DARPA". • Read more »

1/26/2018Jennifer Kuzma elected to the Societal Impacts of Science and Engineering committee of AAASScience Jennifer Kuzma elected to AAASJennifer Kuzma

AAAS Elections results

Jennifer Kuzma elected to the Societal Impacts of Science and Engineering committee of AAAS, Science | 1/26/2018

Jennifer Kuzma elected to AAAS • Read more »

1/15/2018Ewan CallawayNatureDr. Fred Gould, in Nature, discusses a gene editing tool designed to prevent interbreeding between synthetic and wild organisms. The technology targets gene expression, and could be applied to mosquitoes to control infectious diseases, such as malaria, or to invasive species, like Asian carp. “This is an ingenious system and, if successful, could have many applications,” and that he is excited to see new approaches that could be used for genetic biocontrol of pests beyond what is currently available. “I would never want to put all my eggs in one basket.”Fred Gould

Synthetic species made to shun sex with wild organisms

Ewan Callaway, Nature | 1/15/2018

Dr. Fred Gould, in Nature, discusses a gene editing tool designed to prevent interbreeding between synthetic and wild organisms. The technology targets gene expression, and could be applied to mosquitoes to control infectious diseases, such as malaria, or to invasive species, like Asian carp. “This is an ingenious system and, if successful, could have many applications,” and that he is excited to see new approaches that could be used for genetic biocontrol of pests beyond what is currently available. “I would never want to put all my eggs in one basket.” • Read more »

12/15/2017Leslie BoneyInstitute for Emerging IssuesDr. Jennifer Kuzma speaks with Leslie Boney, Director of the Institute for Emerging Issues (IEI) at NC State on the First in Future podcast. In this pod, Dr. Kuzma discusses gene edited mosquitoes, the ethics of Ancestry.com, DIYbio, and why Millennials give her hope. Plus, her book recommendations – Rise of the Robots by Martin Ford – and which Bob Dylan song best summarizes her view of the future.Jennifer Kuzma

First in Future podcast: Jennifer Kuzma

Leslie Boney, Institute for Emerging Issues | 12/15/2017

Dr. Jennifer Kuzma speaks with Leslie Boney, Director of the Institute for Emerging Issues (IEI) at NC State on the First in Future podcast. In this pod, Dr. Kuzma discusses gene edited mosquitoes, the ethics of Ancestry.com, DIYbio, and why Millennials give her hope. Plus, her book recommendations – Rise of the Robots by Martin Ford – and which Bob Dylan song best summarizes her view of the future. • Read more »

12/11/2017Jon CohenScienceIt had scandal written all over it. Disclosed emails revealed that a covert coalition lobbying for relaxed regulations around a genetic extinction technology, with help from a well-funded public relations firm, Emerging Ag, was attempting to game the system and manipulate the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). That was the spin in press releases issued last week by several watchdog groups that want a moratorium on research related to gene drives, which could enable bioengineers to increase the odds of passing down genes to offspring. The people in the supposed covert coalition say it’s nothing of the sort, they have no interest in gaming the system, and that their opponents are manipulating the truth. “It’s complete bullshit,” says Todd Kuiken, a synthetic biology researcher at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, who is a central target of the criticisms. “It’s asinine.”Todd Kuiken

Is there really a covert manipulation of U.N. discussions about regulating gene drives?

Jon Cohen, Science | 12/11/2017

It had scandal written all over it. Disclosed emails revealed that a covert coalition lobbying for relaxed regulations around a genetic extinction technology, with help from a well-funded public relations firm, Emerging Ag, was attempting to game the system and manipulate the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). That was the spin in press releases issued last week by several watchdog groups that want a moratorium on research related to gene drives, which could enable bioengineers to increase the odds of passing down genes to offspring. The people in the supposed covert coalition say it’s nothing of the sort, they have no interest in gaming the system, and that their opponents are manipulating the truth. “It’s complete bullshit,” says Todd Kuiken, a synthetic biology researcher at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, who is a central target of the criticisms. “It’s asinine.” • Read more »

12/5/2017Editorial staffPhys.org"Imposing a moratorium on such promising, life-saving and life-improving innovations so early in their development would be unwarranted, damaging and irresponsible," the group said last December in response to the moratorium push. Todd Kuiken, a researcher at North Carolina State University and a member of AHTEG, agrees. "From a science perspective, putting a blanket moratorium on gene drive research just doesn't make sense to me," he told AFP. "You can't learn anything if you can't study it."Todd Kuiken

Genetic tool that can doom a species under UN review

Editorial staff, Phys.org | 12/5/2017

"Imposing a moratorium on such promising, life-saving and life-improving innovations so early in their development would be unwarranted, damaging and irresponsible," the group said last December in response to the moratorium push. Todd Kuiken, a researcher at North Carolina State University and a member of AHTEG, agrees. "From a science perspective, putting a blanket moratorium on gene drive research just doesn't make sense to me," he told AFP. "You can't learn anything if you can't study it." • Read more »

11/28/2017Jennifer Brookland and Frank StasioWUNC's The State of ThingsBut scientists are also calling for greater thought and reflection as we make changes that could have unforeseen consequences on organisms and ecosystems. Host Frank Stasio talks with Todd Kuiken, senior research scholar for the Genetic Engineering & Society Center at North Carolina State University, about who should have access to gene editing tools and how the international community might continue to regulate them.Todd Kuiken

The Ability To Edit Genes Raises Big Questions On Regulation

Jennifer Brookland and Frank Stasio, WUNC's The State of Things | 11/28/2017

But scientists are also calling for greater thought and reflection as we make changes that could have unforeseen consequences on organisms and ecosystems. Host Frank Stasio talks with Todd Kuiken, senior research scholar for the Genetic Engineering & Society Center at North Carolina State University, about who should have access to gene editing tools and how the international community might continue to regulate them. • Read more »

11/21/2017Chelsea KellnerNC State CALS NewsPh.D. student Johanna Elsensohn understands the importance of intersecting science with policy: During the international Zika virus crisis, she worked with policymakers on one of her regular trips to Washington, D.C., as an entomology expert and advisor. Elsensohn studies genetic pest management, using genetic tools to modify pests themselves rather than plants. She was drawn to CALS for the chance to “not only focus on my discipline, but also on the social, economic, political implications of what my work implies.”Johnanna Elsensohn

Scientist to the Senators: Ph.D. Student Johanna Elsensohn

Chelsea Kellner, NC State CALS News | 11/21/2017

Ph.D. student Johanna Elsensohn understands the importance of intersecting science with policy: During the international Zika virus crisis, she worked with policymakers on one of her regular trips to Washington, D.C., as an entomology expert and advisor. Elsensohn studies genetic pest management, using genetic tools to modify pests themselves rather than plants. She was drawn to CALS for the chance to “not only focus on my discipline, but also on the social, economic, political implications of what my work implies.” • Read more »

11/16/2017Carl ZimmerNew York TimesInternational negotiations might be required before such genetically modified mosquitoes were set loose. “That’s not a question for scientists to answer on their own,” said Jason A. Delborne, a social scientist at North Carolina State University and a member of the N.A.S. gene drive committee.Jason Delborne

Gene Drives’ Are Too Risky for Field Trials, Scientists Say

Carl Zimmer, New York Times | 11/16/2017

International negotiations might be required before such genetically modified mosquitoes were set loose. “That’s not a question for scientists to answer on their own,” said Jason A. Delborne, a social scientist at North Carolina State University and a member of the N.A.S. gene drive committee. • Read more »

11/16/2017Brooke BorelQuantaAmong those who disagree with their assessment is Jason Delborne, one of the authors of the 2016 report and a professor of science, policy and society at North Carolina State University. While the 2016 report did suggest a stepwise approach to field tests, the authors “concluded that not enough was known to pursue an environmental release,” Delborne wrote by email.Jason Delborne

New Model Warns About CRISPR Gene Drives in the Wild

Brooke Borel, Quanta | 11/16/2017

Among those who disagree with their assessment is Jason Delborne, one of the authors of the 2016 report and a professor of science, policy and society at North Carolina State University. While the 2016 report did suggest a stepwise approach to field tests, the authors “concluded that not enough was known to pursue an environmental release,” Delborne wrote by email. • Read more »

11/16/2017Kristen V. BrownGizmodo“This is part of an ongoing conversation about the balances of risk and benefits of gene drive technology,” said Jason Delborne, a scientist who works on gene drives at North Carolina State University who was not involved in the recent work. “These new papers signal that we should be even more cautious about gene drive technology.”Jason Delborne

Genetically Engineering the Natural World, it Turns Out, Could Be a Disaster

Kristen V. Brown, Gizmodo | 11/16/2017

“This is part of an ongoing conversation about the balances of risk and benefits of gene drive technology,” said Jason Delborne, a scientist who works on gene drives at North Carolina State University who was not involved in the recent work. “These new papers signal that we should be even more cautious about gene drive technology.” • Read more »

11/14/2017Chelsea KellnerNC State CALS NewsThe academic journey of Florida native Mike Jones spans Peruvian potato fields and the irrigated deserts of Syria to arrive where Jones is today: on NC State’s campus, a Ph.D. student investigating the impacts and public perception of cutting-edge agricultural technology.Mike Jones

Student Spotlight: Mike Jones and the Economics of Cutting-Edge Ag Technology

Chelsea Kellner, NC State CALS News | 11/14/2017

The academic journey of Florida native Mike Jones spans Peruvian potato fields and the irrigated deserts of Syria to arrive where Jones is today: on NC State’s campus, a Ph.D. student investigating the impacts and public perception of cutting-edge agricultural technology. • Read more »

11/7/2017Jennifer KuzmaGES CenterOPINION | In recent years, the regulatory system for biotechnology products has not kept pace with newer ways of engineering organisms, such as through the use of gene editing like CRISPR-Cas9 systems. Under the Obama administration, progress had been made in clarifying U.S. biotechnology regulations. In January 2017, in the last few days of Obama’s term, several proposals were made for updating agency regulations and guidance documents. In particular, new US Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulations were proposed for genetically engineered (GE) crops.Jennifer Kuzma

Politics “Trumps” Science in the Regulation of Genetically Engineered Crops

Jennifer Kuzma, GES Center | 11/7/2017

OPINION | In recent years, the regulatory system for biotechnology products has not kept pace with newer ways of engineering organisms, such as through the use of gene editing like CRISPR-Cas9 systems. Under the Obama administration, progress had been made in clarifying U.S. biotechnology regulations. In January 2017, in the last few days of Obama’s term, several proposals were made for updating agency regulations and guidance documents. In particular, new US Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulations were proposed for genetically engineered (GE) crops. • Read more »

11/7/2017Paul McDivittGenetic Literacy Project“My thinking is that if a rule is criticized by both sides on the same points, it has probably struck a good balance,” said Jennifer Kuzma, a professor at North Carolina State University’s School of Public and International Affairs. She sees the Trump administration’s anti-regulation philosophy at work, and GE crop developers as the likely beneficiary of the withdrawal.Jennifer Kuzma

USDA scraps overhaul of GMO and gene edited crop regulations that biotech advocates viewed as 'unscientific'"

Paul McDivitt, Genetic Literacy Project | 11/7/2017

“My thinking is that if a rule is criticized by both sides on the same points, it has probably struck a good balance,” said Jennifer Kuzma, a professor at North Carolina State University’s School of Public and International Affairs. She sees the Trump administration’s anti-regulation philosophy at work, and GE crop developers as the likely beneficiary of the withdrawal. • Read more »

11/6/2017Kelly ServickScienceIt’s a predictable move by President Donald Trump’s White House to take another look at the policies of the previous administration, says Jennifer Kuzma, a social scientist who co-directs the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. “I expected them to eventually catch wind that this was something that USDA was doing, and reverse it.”Jennifer Kuzma

Trump’s agriculture department reverses course on biotech rules

Kelly Servick, Science | 11/6/2017

It’s a predictable move by President Donald Trump’s White House to take another look at the policies of the previous administration, says Jennifer Kuzma, a social scientist who co-directs the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. “I expected them to eventually catch wind that this was something that USDA was doing, and reverse it.” • Read more »

11/1/2017Stephen S. HallScientific AmericanTwo of his colleagues, Fred Gould and David Threadgill, were already discussing the possibility of tinkering with the mouse genome in an attempt to create mice incapable of producing female offspring. Two other colleagues, Jennifer Kuzma and Jason Delborne, became deeply involved in how to engage the larger world of stakeholders—government regulatory agencies, animal management officials, bioethicists and, of course, the general public—in considering the prospect of releasing genetically altered animals into the wild. Kuzma and Gould serve as co-directors of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State.Jason Delborne, Fred Gould, Jennifer Kuzma

Could Genetic Engineering Save the Galápagos?

Stephen S. Hall, Scientific American | 11/1/2017

Two of his colleagues, Fred Gould and David Threadgill, were already discussing the possibility of tinkering with the mouse genome in an attempt to create mice incapable of producing female offspring. Two other colleagues, Jennifer Kuzma and Jason Delborne, became deeply involved in how to engage the larger world of stakeholders—government regulatory agencies, animal management officials, bioethicists and, of course, the general public—in considering the prospect of releasing genetically altered animals into the wild. Kuzma and Gould serve as co-directors of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State. • Read more »

10/25/2017Chelsea KellnerNC State CALS NewsTitled “Art’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology: Shaping Our Genetic Future(s),” the exhibit was a partnership between NC State’s Genetic Engineering and Society Center (GES), the NC State Libraries and the museum, CAM Raleigh. It’s part of a broader effort to maintain public education and engagement that can help guide the cutting edge innovation.GES Center

Our (Possible) Genetic Futures

Chelsea Kellner, NC State CALS News | 10/25/2017

Titled “Art’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology: Shaping Our Genetic Future(s),” the exhibit was a partnership between NC State’s Genetic Engineering and Society Center (GES), the NC State Libraries and the museum, CAM Raleigh. It’s part of a broader effort to maintain public education and engagement that can help guide the cutting edge innovation. • Read more »

10/13/2017Abby OlenaThe Scientist“Aedes aegypti transmit dengue, Zika, and other viral diseases,” explains North Carolina State University entomologist Fred Gould. Because vaccine development has thus far been challenging and the available dengue vaccine is only partially effective, the current strategy for combatting these diseases is insect control, which includes spraying millions of dollars worth of insecticides. As an alternative, biotech firms have been working on developing tools like the genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes and mosquitoes infected with Wolbachia, a bacterium that can disrupt virus transmission from mosquito to human. “You need to come at it from all directions responsibly,” Gould adds.Fred Gould

GM Mosquitoes Closer to Release in U.S.

Abby Olena, The Scientist | 10/13/2017

“Aedes aegypti transmit dengue, Zika, and other viral diseases,” explains North Carolina State University entomologist Fred Gould. Because vaccine development has thus far been challenging and the available dengue vaccine is only partially effective, the current strategy for combatting these diseases is insect control, which includes spraying millions of dollars worth of insecticides. As an alternative, biotech firms have been working on developing tools like the genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes and mosquitoes infected with Wolbachia, a bacterium that can disrupt virus transmission from mosquito to human. “You need to come at it from all directions responsibly,” Gould adds. • Read more »

10/1/2017Brooke BorelScientific American“Without transparency, we might see a kind of hyperpolarization,” says Jason Delborne, a professor of science, policy and society at North Carolina State University. Concerned groups will feel marginalized, and advocates won’t receive critical feedback needed to improve design and safety. “This puts the technology at risk of a knee-jerk moratorium at the first sign of difficulty,” he notes.Jason Delborne, Jennifer Kuzma

Can Scientists Convince the Public to Accept CRISPR and Gene Drives?

Brooke Borel, Scientific American | 10/1/2017

“Without transparency, we might see a kind of hyperpolarization,” says Jason Delborne, a professor of science, policy and society at North Carolina State University. Concerned groups will feel marginalized, and advocates won’t receive critical feedback needed to improve design and safety. “This puts the technology at risk of a knee-jerk moratorium at the first sign of difficulty,” he notes. • Read more »

9/28/2017Kelly ServickScience“I had been one of the people who was pretty skeptical that this could work,” says Fred Gould, an evolutionary biologist at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. That’s in part because it’s hard to get a bacterium to thrive in the competitive environment of the gut, he says, and to stick with the mosquitoes as they grow from larvae to adults. “But it looks like they’re making some interesting progress here.”Fred Gould

The microbes in a mosquito's gut may help fight malaria

Kelly Servick, Science | 9/28/2017

“I had been one of the people who was pretty skeptical that this could work,” says Fred Gould, an evolutionary biologist at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. That’s in part because it’s hard to get a bacterium to thrive in the competitive environment of the gut, he says, and to stick with the mosquitoes as they grow from larvae to adults. “But it looks like they’re making some interesting progress here.” • Read more »

9/8/2017Sarah ZhangThe AtlanticScientists are watching the diamondback moth trial closely. “I’ll be very interested to see if this thing succeeds,” says Fred Gould, an entomologist at North Carolina State University. In addition to diamondback moths and mosquitoes, Oxitec has a handful of other genetically engineered insects that can be used to tackle common pests: the Mediterranean fruit fly, the Mexican fruit fly, and the olive fly.Fred Gould

Genetically Modified Moths Come to New York

Sarah Zhang, The Atlantic | 9/8/2017

Scientists are watching the diamondback moth trial closely. “I’ll be very interested to see if this thing succeeds,” says Fred Gould, an entomologist at North Carolina State University. In addition to diamondback moths and mosquitoes, Oxitec has a handful of other genetically engineered insects that can be used to tackle common pests: the Mediterranean fruit fly, the Mexican fruit fly, and the olive fly. • Read more »

8/3/2017John GodwinNC State NewsIn one approach, said project principal investigator John Godwin, an NC State professor of biological sciences, researchers would use genetic techniques to affect sex ratios by preventing the development of most female offspring. A few fertile males would continue to drive the sex-change construct through subsequent generations. The lack of females would quickly cause mouse populations to plummet.Todd Kuiken

NC State Receives DARPA Funding to Develop, Test Gene Drive System

John Godwin, NC State News | 8/3/2017

In one approach, said project principal investigator John Godwin, an NC State professor of biological sciences, researchers would use genetic techniques to affect sex ratios by preventing the development of most female offspring. A few fertile males would continue to drive the sex-change construct through subsequent generations. The lack of females would quickly cause mouse populations to plummet. • Read more »

7/21/2017Ewan CallawayNature Todd Kuiken, who studies policy relating to synthetic biology at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, is glad to see gene-drive research receive more funding. But he has qualms about the US military’s interest in the field; with Safe Genes, DARPA has become the world’s largest government funder of gene-drive research. Kuiken worries that this could sow suspicions about gene drives in parts of the world that view the US military in a less-than-favourable light, including countries that stand to benefit from the elimination of disease carriers such as mosquitoes.Todd Kuiken

US defence agencies grapple with gene drives

Ewan Callaway, Nature | 7/21/2017

Todd Kuiken, who studies policy relating to synthetic biology at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, is glad to see gene-drive research receive more funding. But he has qualms about the US military’s interest in the field; with Safe Genes, DARPA has become the world’s largest government funder of gene-drive research. Kuiken worries that this could sow suspicions about gene drives in parts of the world that view the US military in a less-than-favourable light, including countries that stand to benefit from the elimination of disease carriers such as mosquitoes. • Read more »

7/20/2017Richard ConniffYale Environment 360“The success of this idea depends heavily,” according to gene drive researcher Megan Serr, “on the genetically modified male mice being ‘studs’ with the island lady mice … Will she want a hybrid male that is part wild, part lab?” Beyond that, the research program needs to figure out how many modified mice to introduce to eradicate an invasive population in a habitat of a particular size.Megan Serr

Should Genetic Engineering Be Used as a Tool for Conservation?

Richard Conniff, Yale Environment 360 | 7/20/2017

“The success of this idea depends heavily,” according to gene drive researcher Megan Serr, “on the genetically modified male mice being ‘studs’ with the island lady mice … Will she want a hybrid male that is part wild, part lab?” Beyond that, the research program needs to figure out how many modified mice to introduce to eradicate an invasive population in a habitat of a particular size. • Read more »

7/11/2017Brooke BorelAudubon MagazineCRISPR wouldn’t be unveiled for another year, but Godwin’s colleagues were already working on a natural gene drive in mosquitoes to curb dengue fever. Could a similar approach, he wondered, combat invasive mice? Given his expertise, Godwin was especially curious whether an engineered mouse would stand a chance wooing wild females. He convinced entomologist Fred Gould, co-director of NC State’s Center on Genetic Engineering and Society, and David Threadgill, a mouse geneticist with a focus on biomedicine, to take on Farallon mice as a test case. They arranged a conference call with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which manages the islands.Fred Gould, Jennifer Kuzma, John Godwin

How Genetically Modified Mice Could One Day Save Island Birds

Brooke Borel, Audubon Magazine | 7/11/2017

CRISPR wouldn’t be unveiled for another year, but Godwin’s colleagues were already working on a natural gene drive in mosquitoes to curb dengue fever. Could a similar approach, he wondered, combat invasive mice? Given his expertise, Godwin was especially curious whether an engineered mouse would stand a chance wooing wild females. He convinced entomologist Fred Gould, co-director of NC State’s Center on Genetic Engineering and Society, and David Threadgill, a mouse geneticist with a focus on biomedicine, to take on Farallon mice as a test case. They arranged a conference call with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which manages the islands. • Read more »

5/15/2017Todd KuikenSlateIn recent years, however, the military—mostly under the umbrella of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency—has created a new suite of programs that take a very different approach to harnessing the power of nature: synthetic biology. Among other initiatives, researchers at DARPA are attempting to engineer insects to deliver protective genes to plants; to transform bacteria and yeast into factories to produce on-demand chemicals and fuels; and to develop methods to reverse any threats posed by gene drives.Todd Kuiken

DARPA’s Synthetic Biology Initiatives Could Militarize the Environment

Todd Kuiken, Slate | 5/15/2017

In recent years, however, the military—mostly under the umbrella of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency—has created a new suite of programs that take a very different approach to harnessing the power of nature: synthetic biology. Among other initiatives, researchers at DARPA are attempting to engineer insects to deliver protective genes to plants; to transform bacteria and yeast into factories to produce on-demand chemicals and fuels; and to develop methods to reverse any threats posed by gene drives. • Read more »

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About Us

The Genetic Engineering and Society (GES) Center at NC State University serves as an international hub of interdisciplinary research, engaged scholarship and inclusive dialogues surrounding opportunities and challenges associated with genetic engineering and society.

Positioned at the nexus of science and technology, the social sciences and humanities, the GES Center has taken a national and international lead in examining the technical, ethical, and societal dimensions of the products and impacts of biotechnology.

Center Directors

Dr. Jennifer Kuzma
Goodnight-NC GSK Foundation Distinguished Professor
CHASS, School of Public and International Affairs
919-515-2592 | jkuzma@ncsu.edu

Dr. Fred Gould
University Distinguished Professor
CALS, Entomology and Plant Pathology
919.515.1647 | fgould@ncsu.edu

See full faculty directory