2019

Whole Genome Sequencing Technologies using Oxford Nanopore Technologies to enable high quality reference genomes.

Presented by Nick Beckloff, Ph.D., FAS

Wednesday, May 8th from 1:30-3:00 PM (Stephens Room – 3503 Thomas Hall).

Hosted by the NC State Genetics & Genomics Initiative and the Genomic Sciences Laboratory. See Event Flyer for more information.

 

 

LogoIllumina DNA Workshop Using the Nextera™ DNA Flex Library Preparation Kit on the NovaSeq 6000

THIS WORKSHOP IS CURRENTLY FULL – Please email us for inquiries on waitlisting for future workshops.

Hosted by the NCSU BIT Program and the Genomic Sciences Laboratory

Monday, May 13th (9am-4pm) – Tuesday, May 14th (9am-12:00pm); Jordan Hall Lab Room 6136

Please join us for a hands on experience of our easy and efficient, Nextera DNA Flex Library Prep workflow for WGS of any genome, using your own samples on the GSL NovaSeq 6000. Learn from expert Illumina scientists as they guide you through: Library Preparation & Best Practices, Experimental Design for DNA sequencing Projects, and Data Analysis in BaseSpace™Sequence Hub. Sequencing data will be delivered by the Genomic Sciences Laboratory, followed by a review Q&A session with the Illumina workshop team.

How Hi-C is Transforming Genome and Metagenome Assembly

Thursday, March 28th from 12:00-1:00 PM (Stephens Room – 3503 Thomas Hall).

Chromosome conformation capture methods like Hi-C measure the 3D organization of DNA in vivo using a combination of crosslinking, proximity-ligation, and paired-end sequencing.

Because this method captures genomic contiguity on intact chromosomes, the resultant information can be used to generate end-to-end chromosome-scale scaffolds for large genomes.  Since Hi-C junctions form within intact cells, any sequences interacting by Hi-C must have originated from the same species/strain in a mixed population, enabling metagenomic deconvolution.

2018

CLC Genomics Training Workshop

Friday, October 26th, from 9:00 am – 5:00 pm (lunch provided if registered).

Stephens Room (Room 3503), Thomas Hall, Main Campus

9:00 – 9:45 AM: Installing CLC, connecting to your network, how to connect to the HPC, network rules/best practices, data transfer, GSL website tour.

9:45 – 10:30 AM: Introduction: Why Genomics Workbench?: Genomics Workbench user interface and concept of workflow.

10:30 – 12:00 PM: DNA sequencing and Variant calling

12:00-1:00 PM: Lunch  ** Lunch will be provided to registered participants **

1:00-2:00 PM: RNAseq analysis

2:00-3:30 PM: Microbial Genomics Module (Plugin) – Introduction and Taxonomic Profiling (Amplicon-based vs Whole Genome).

3:30-4:30 PM: De novo sequencing and Genome Finishing (Plugin) Overview

4:30-5:00 PM: Flex time, other topics of interest.

BioRAD Power PCR Seminar

Tuesday, October 23rd from 11:00AM – 1:00 PM

Stephens Room (3503 Thomas Hall)

Lunch Provided

SPEAKER: John Chuckalovcak, Senior Field Application Scientist, Bio-Rad Laboratories

Whether you are a first-time qPCR user or an experienced researcher trying to decide if digital PCR is right for you, this course will provide you with the knowledge and skill to design the right experiment and extract the most meaningful and publishable results from your data. What you will learn: Real-Time PCR – Best Practices and Potential Pitfalls (and how to avoid them), Bio-Rad’s statistical analysis software: How to get the most out of your qPCR data; Droplet Digital PCR – How it works and when to use it.

Pacific Biosciences Seminar

Thursday, October 18th from 11:30 – 1:30 pm

Stephens Room (3503 Thomas)

Refreshment & Dessert Provided (bring your lunch)

Please Register Here

Seminar Agenda: “SMRT Sequencing Technology and Application Overview” by Jay Morris, PacBio Field Application Scientist, followed by “Getting Started with SMRT Sequencing Analysis” by Kristina Weber, Bioinformatics Field Support. Then, one of our NCSU faculty, Dr. Marce Lorenzen will present some her PacBio research, entitled “You can take the high road AND the low road: Experiments that benefit from different levels of PacBio coverage.” Attend the seminar for more information on a local PacBio SMRT grant opportunity.

TWIST Bioscience Lunch & Learn Seminar

Thursday, October 11th 12:00 – 1:00 PM

Stephens Room (3503 Thomas Hall)

Lunch Provided (Limited Seating)

 

Better Targeted & Exome Sequencing – Join us for a lunch and learn about exome and targeted sequencing. We’ll cover how Twist’s silicone-based DNA synthesis platform has revolutionized target enrichment, allowing researchers to sequence less and discover more. We’ll discuss our double-stranded probes, GC-boosted designs, and easy-to-design custom panels that have a market-leading three week turn-around-time. Hosted by the Genomics Sciences Laboratory, lunch provided by Twist. Speaker: Mark Consugar – TWIST Field Application Scientist.

Metabolomics Workshop

Thursday, April 19th from 10:30 AM – 2:30 PM (Stephens Room, 3503 Thomas Hall)

Lunch will be provided to registered participants – click here to register.

Metabolon is the global leader in metabolomics and has developed an unbiased global approach to profiling the entire innate human metabolome and a vast amount of xenobiotics. Metabolomics provides proximity to disease, as small molecules are the closest molecular trait to the observed phenotype that represents the functions of the genes in the environment at that particular time. Unlike other ‘omics’ technologies, metabolomics provides a biochemical signature that takes into account not only genetics, but also the effects of lifestyle, diet and the environment on the health status of an individual.

From Contigs to Chromosomes: how Hi-C is transforming genome and metagenome assembly

Friday, March 2nd 2:30 – 3:30 PM (Stephens Room – 3503 Thomas Hall) – refreshments provided.

Chromosome conformation capture methods like Hi-C measure the 3D organization of DNA in vivo using a combination of crosslinking, proximity-ligation, and paired-end sequencing.  Because this method captures genomic contiguity on intact chromosomes, the resultant information can be used to generate end-to-end chromosome-scale scaffolds for large genomes.  Since Hi-C junctions form within intact cells, any sequences interacting by Hi-C must have originated from the same species/strain in a mixed population, enabling metagenomic deconvolution.  Capturing genomic proximity information in vivo removes several major obstacles in genome and metagenome assembly, improving the quality and efficiency of genomic discovery efforts.

DovetailDovetail Genomics Seminar

Wednesday, February 14th 10:30 – 11:30 PM (Stephens Room – 3503 Thomas Hall)

A contiguous and accurate genome assembly is a crucial first step in fully understanding the biology of any organism. A high-quality genome assembly will make any downstream analyses, like gene annotation, synteny, comparative genomics and population genetics far easier and more reliable. Dovetail Genomics is the leading service provider for high quality genome assemblies. To date, we have completed more than 400 projects, spanning many classes of organisms from plants to reptiles, amphibians, fish, mammals, birds, insects and more. Using our two complementary scaffolding methods, Chicago and Dovetail Hi-C, we are dramatically increasing the contiguity and accuracy of genome assemblies, enabling true, full-chromosome-length scaffolding. This talk will provide an update on our most current technologies. We will profile several customer projects and discuss how improvements in their assemblies led to better science and new discoveries.

2017

ThermoFisher Scientific CRISPR Seminar

Wednesday, November 29th 12:00 – 1:00 PM (Stephens Room – 3503 Thomas Hall)

Lunch Provided for Registered Participants (Register Here)

CRISPR-Cas9 systems provide a platform for high- efficiency genome editing that can lead to innovative applications in cell engineering. However, the delivery of Cas9 and the synthesis of guide RNA (gRNA) remain as the two steps that can limit overall efficiency and general ease of use. In the technical seminar, “How to boost your CRISPR editing efficiencies,” we’ll discuss the rate-limiting steps in current CRISPR-Cas9 workflows, and introduce streamlined methods to help reduce the editing workflow timeline to just 4 days.

logoNRGene Seminar

Wednesday, November 8th from 2:00-4:00 PM in the Stephens Room (3503 Thomas Hall). 

Refreshments will be provided – please RSVP to David Neuman (ndavid@nrgene.com)

Moving beyond a single reference genome: GenoMAGIC, a novel solution to describe and manage genomic variation.

Guest Speaker: Dr. Paul Chomet

NGS technologies have opened the door to multiple genome analyses and an increased understanding of the variations present in populations. To date, most of the germplasm analyses have relied on the comparison of sequence reads to one reference genome assembly, limiting our understanding of genomic variation. NRGene has developed novel analytics and approaches to efficiently de- novo assemble genomes and describe the relevant variation across germplasm using a pan-genome approach. Using this approach, we are able to perform critical analyses including, haplotype imputation from sequence based genotyping and marker selection for array design to aid in molecular breeding and gene discovery.

 CLC Genomics Training Workshops

Wednesday-Thursday, August 30-31, from 8:00 am – 5:00 pm (lunch provided if registered).

 

Day One (August 30th) — Toxicology Auditorium (Room 2014), Toxicology Building, Centennial Campus (see Event Flyer)

8:00-10:00 AM: Installing CLC, connecting to your network, how to connect to the HPC, network rules/best practices, data transfer, GSL website navigation.

10:15-11:00 AM: Basic software overview and intro to Biomedical WB, intro to the user interface, importing NGS data,reference management, and intro to the workflow concept and overview of all the tools.

11:00-12:00 PM: Create workflows for read mapping, variant calling (with Bisulfite Sequencing focus)

12:00-1:00 PM: Lunch  ** Lunch will be provided to all registered participants **

1:00-2:00 PM – Workshop 1: Review results from Bisulfite sequencing and working with Tracks

2:00-3:30 PM – Workshop 2: RNAseq analysis

3:45-5:00 PM – Workshop 3: CLC Genomics to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (Advanced)

 

Day Two (August 31st) — Stephens Room (Room 3503), Thomas Hall, Main Campus (see Event Flyer)

8:00-10:00 AM: Installing CLC, connecting to your network, how to connect to the HPC, network rules/best practices, data transfer, GSL website tour.

10:15-11:00 AM: Basic software overview, intro to the user interface, importing NGS data, downloading from SRA, downloading from NCBI, intro to the workflow concept and overview of all the tools.

11:00-12:00 PM: Create workflows for de novo assembly

12:00-1:00 PM: Lunch  ** Lunch will be provided to all registered participants **

1:00-2:00 PM – Workshop 1: De novo assembly (Illumina and PacBio)

2:00-3:00 PM – Workshop 2: Genome Finishing Analysis (Plugin)

3:00-4:00 PM – Workshop 3: Microbial Genomics Analysis (Plugin)

4:00-5:00 PM – Workshop 4: Advanced RNAseq analysis

Please register for this event by email: khushbu.kariwala@qiagen.com 

BD Genomics Single Cell Sequencing Seminar

Wednesday, March 22nd from 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Room 3503 Thomas Hall (Stephen’s Room)

Featured Speaker: John Harrington, Technical Applications Scientist, BD Genomics

Please RSVP to: Fran Moses, BD Single Cell Business Partner – fran.moses@bd.com

Utilizing FACS to Resolve Gene Expression Data with Precision

Powerful molecular biology tools and methods are common. However, data produced by these tools and assays typically show the average signals from a bulk sample made up of many cells. In fields such as hematology, cancer biology, and cell biology, these methods may not yield the proper data, because the cells of interest may comprise only a small minority in a heterogeneous sample, hence their behavior is drowned out by that of the majority. Accurate characterization of these minority cells can only be performed by single cell analysis. In this presentation, I will explain BD’s new technologies for single cell analysis, and how they may be combined with FACS to produce data that links phenotypic markers to genotypic expression

  • Hosted by: Genomic Sciences Laboratory (GSL) at NCSU | 919-513-3882
  • See Event Flyer PDF

2016

thermofisherThermoFisher/Applied Biosystems Technical Seminar

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016 from 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Thomas Hall, Room 3503 (Stephens Room) – Lunch provided! Please register Here for the event.

Featured Speaker: Lawrence Yoon

Explore the world of RNA

Learn about best practices for laboratory setup when working with RNA, and how to select the right isolation kit for your sample type.  Choose between qPCR, next-gen sequencing, or microarray workflows to interrogate your samples as you study gene expression, the transcriptome, small RNA’s, splice variants, and fusions.  We will also cover the basics of the data output from each of these platforms and how you can analyze it.  Finally, compare the strengths of each to determine which platform is best suited to your project needs

  • Hosted by: Genomic Sciences Laboratory (GSL) at NCSU | 919-513-3882
  • See Event Flyer PDF

LogoIllumina Agricultural Genomics Seminar

Thursday October 27th, 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Thomas Hall, Room 3503 (Stephens Room) – Lunch provided!

Featured Speaker: Ryan Rapp, Associate Director, Agrigenomics, Illumina, Inc.

Limited Space available! Please register at event registration. illumina.com/NCSTATE

Please join us for a next-generation sequencing (NGS) seminar!Illumina sequencing and genotyping technologies touch many steps of the agrigenomics pipeline. Our technology enhances knowledge of the genetic foundations of production, reproduction, and health for a wide variety of applications and species. Illumina’s next-generation sequencing is particularly useful in agricultural research, where genomes can be complex and prior knowledge scarce. NGS is also used to identify pathogens. It allows tracking of microbial or viral adaptation over short periods of time, both in the laboratory and in the environment.

  • Hosted by: Genomic Sciences Laboratory (GSL) at NCSU | 919-513-3882
  • See Event Flyer PDF

lgcLGC Genomics Seminar

Thursday, October 13th 11:00 am – 12:30 pm

Thomas Hall, Room 3503 (Stephens Room) – Lunch provided!

Please register here for the event!

Featured Speaker: Dr. Niko Tsatsos, LGC Genomics Field Application Scientist

Are you ready for a genotyping game changer?  The evolution of genotyping has been extraordinary over the years starting from lab-made PCR reactions and hand-poured gels to commercially purchased master mixes and end-point PCR reading systems.  Although the latter enabled greater throughput without extensively reducing hands-on time, LGC (now incorporating Douglas Scientific® and Biosearch Technologies) is introducing simplified and automated genotyping workflow solutions that can generate up to 23,000 data points per day with minimal hands-on time at a greater cost savings.  Whether you focus on trait development, routine screening, zygosity, marker development, or other medium to high-throughput workflows, please join us at our upcoming seminar by registering today to learn more about how our innovative technologies can make your life simpler.

  • Hosted by: Genomic Sciences Laboratory (GSL) at NCSU | 919-513-3882
  • See Event Flyer PDF

phpThumb_generated_thumbnailFluidigm Seminar: Using Microfluidic Technologies to Overcome Challenges in Non-Model Organism Research

Monday, May 9th 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Thomas Hall, Room 3503 (Stephens Room), lunch provided!

Population genetics, genotyping by sequencing, phylogenetics, pathogen detection, metagenomics from environmental samples, and high-throughput qPCR for functional genomics require numerous genomic loci, but finding and accessing enough, especially from precious sample types and non-model organisms, poses important challenges.  Using Fluidigm’s microfluidic technologies in your research provides many advantages, such as reducing reaction sizes to nanoliter volumes, and interrogating more than 96 SNP loci or genes or targeted sequences in a single run from a single, small aliquot of your sample.  A single run completes within hours, allowing you to finally acquire enough genetic loci from your limited sample input from non-model organisms.  Assays can also be customized to target short amplicons, making it possible to genotype degraded sample types (including formalin-fixed samples, non-invasive fecal samples, fish scales, and epidermal swabs).  Stop by to hear and learn how microfluidics can help you achieve data density from precious sample inputs and fuel your non-model organism life science research.

  • Hosted by: Genomic Sciences Laboratory (GSL) at NCSU | 919-513-3882
  • See Event Flyer PDF

Slide1Nanostring Seminar: Multiplexed Digital Quantification of Nucleic Acids without Sample Amplification using the nCounter Analysis System.

Thursday, March 31st 2016

Room 3503 Thomas Hall (Stephens Room) from 12:00 – 1:00 pm, with lunch provided

Please join us for a special seminar discussing the innovative nCounter analysis system from Nanostring technologies. There will be a special data presentation provided by Dr. Donald Freytes (NCSU/ UNC-Chapel Hill Joint Dept. of Biomedical Engineering).

  • Hosted by: Genomic Sciences Laboratory (GSL) at NCSU | 919-513-3882
  • See Event Flyer PDF

10xLogo_201610X Genomics Seminar

Thursday, March 17th 2016

Room 3503 (Stephens Room) in Thomas Hall, 10:00 – 11:00 am

Chromium Controller: Integrated solutions for whole genome sequencing, exome sequencing and single cell transcriptomics.

Chromium Genome & Chromium Exome: Starting with 1.2ng HMW genomic DNA, unlock the power of megabase-scale phasing and structural variants. Easily integrate the Chromium controller into your existing NGS infrastructure with single-molecule barcoding. We will discuss how our linked-read technology will enable you to achieve long-range information from short-read sequencing.

Chromium Transcriptome: High-throughput RNA-Seq with the Single-Cell 3’ system of 1,000 to 50,000 cells in a single run. With a highly efficient and cost-effective workflow, discover how you can understand which genes are expressed, in what quantities, and how they differ across thousands of cells.

Applied BiosystemsTechnical Seminar: Learning real-time PCR and emerging applications

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2016

Room 3503 (Stephens Room) in Thomas Hall

2:00 – 4:00 pm, snacks and refreshments served

Dr. Mike Troutman (Applied Biosystems) will present a technical seminar on qPCR basics and new emerging applications. The first half of the session (2:00 – 3:00 pm) provides a basic understanding of real-time PCR technology, including an introduction to real-time PCR terminology, reaction components, amplification, assay design, optimization, and reference and control options. The second half of the session (3:00-4:00 pm) focuses on associated applications when working with DNA, RNA, and protein analysis. DNA applications include mutation detection, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and high resolution melt. RNA applications reviewed are gene expression and small RNA. The final section of the talk examines protein expression and thermal shift applications.

Trial samples of PCR Mastermix will be available during the seminar! 

Please register for the event at www.thermofisher.com/eventregistration

2015

Droplet DigitalTM PCR for Precise, Absolute Quantification Presentation

Friday December 18th 2015

Room 3503 (Stephens Room) in Thomas Hall 11:00am to Noon with Lunch served.

Bio-Rad will present on Digital PCR, which is a breakthrough technology that provides ultrasensitive and absolute nucleic acid quantification. It is particularly useful for low abundance targets, targets in complex backgrounds, allelic variants (SNPs), and for monitoring subtle changes in target levels that cannot be detected with real-time PCR.

Hosted by: Genomic Sciences Laboratory (GSL) at NCSU | 919-513-3882

Questions? Please contact: Kelly Weinel or Curtis Alexander at  Bio-Rad Laboratories.